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Lifetime Oath
Lifetime Oath

Episode 1 · 1 year ago

Happy 246th Birthday Marines

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

What happens when you have 4 Marines sit down to talk about the time they served? Oh, and for the Marine Corps Birthday? The discussion is interesting and unfiltered.

Sponsored by Tar Heel Construction Group who is always looking out for active Military, Veterans, First Responders and the community.

So I wanted to do something special for the official first episode of Lifetime Oath. A gout the thinking. It's like, okay, what I do? I mean, the whole ideal was to launch it on Veterans Day. But yeah, when you're a marine and you have a bunch of friends at our Marines, why not get them together, do a podcast and launch it on the Marine Corps Birthday, the day before Veterans Day? Makes Sense to me. So that's what we did. Now, bear warning, this is unfiltered and when you have a table full of jar heads, God only knows what's going to happen. And that's what you're going to hear on this episode of Lifetime Ooth. I gave the reins to Joe Aler of Tar heel construction group. He whosted this. I sat in, as well as three other friends of mine at our Marines and well, Joe has some good questions for us and we talked about the two hundred and forty six marine corps birthday, toys for tots a few other things. I think you're really gonna love this. You're when it came to find a sponsor for lifetime oath, I wanted somebody that I knew cared about the veterans in the first responders, somebody that actually did a lot in the community, and I was able to find that exact person, Joe Oiler of t our heel construction group. I am happy to say they are the exclusive sponsor for lifetime ooth. Tar Heel construction group does basically anything exterior wise on your house, whether besiding, windows, roof, gutters. They take care of it all, and the best thing about it is they look out for the veterans in the first responders. They're not one of these companies that say, Oh, free root for your you know if you're a veteran and all that. They that's a marketing employee. People do that because they want it. They're taking advantage of a lot of the veterans and first responders. In my eyes, Tar heel doesn't do that. Yeah, if they find out you're a veteran, they're going to take care of you. They find out you're a first responder, they're going to take care of you. But guess what, even if you're not, they're still going to take care of you. They are the two thousand and Nineteen Harford Award winner for outstanding service to the community. They are gf master elite Roofer. They have the Harford canty living stamp of approval. They have won the Harford Candy living choice awards as well as the best of Harford. And when it comes to reviews, well, just look down good to t our heel construction GROUPCOM. Do a Google search on tar heel construction group reviews. You'll see how great people love them. Good to tar heel construction groupcom or give them a call at four hundred and zero three, eight seven zero two one. Again, that's four hundred and two extrey, eight seven zero two one. Also, just when the legionative views, information or opinions expressed during lifetime move are sole e there's of the individuals involved and do not necessarily represent those of tar he'll construction group or their employees. My name is rich Bennett and this is lifetime mouth. On this podcast you will hear from veterans active military, their families, their spouses, firefighters, police officers, nurses, doctors, first responders, all these people that serve us. They served to protect us, they serve to defend the constitution of the United States. These are people that have served on wartime. They have served throughout the different cities of the United States or at the world they have served or in peacetime. They have some incredible stories, whether sad. Some will make you man some will make you laugh. These are the people that have taken the lifetime I'm sitting here with for Marines, jar heads, devil dogs. I'm a civilian. So I just want to get that again. Get that, get that out of the way. First. I'm just moderating and just and just humble to be here with these guys. So I'm with Craig reeling, I'm with Mark Saidinski and with rich Bennett and I'm with George Wood and all all marines. And maybe we can start by maybe going around and and maybe identifying when you guys served, and thought you're going to ask us for name, ranked, serial number for a minute there, but I mean, I guess we can go...

...around and what was everybody in Paris island? When did you? When did you serve and what? What? Is it a battalion or or will different? What what group you were in? Maybe we can go start with Greig Star, with Craig. My Name's Craig reeling, and so I went to Parris Island for Boot Camp. I joined the Marine Corps is a little older. I turned twenty three boot camp in one thousand nine hundred and ninety three. I serve through two thousand and one. My full a year commitment ended up being over in May of two thousand and one. So I'm kind of just what I call it in between marine. You know, there weren't any major fighting going on when I was in. Nobody wanted to fight me so like that. So yeah, so I serve for ee years and if for on active duty I was a combat engineers three hundred and seventy one. I tell people it's built stuff and blow stuff up. Had A lot of fun doing that. And then, as a reservist, actually served at six mode of transport battalion up in red back, New Jersey, which is now, I believe, the twenty five mlb, which is Marine Logistics Battalion. So but yeah, they still do a lot of the same work up there in red bank. Had A lot of fun. I'm originally from New Jersey. I've now lived here in Maryland, working full time at Aberdeen Proving Ground and it was part of that whole Brac move eleven years ago. I'm a member of the Marine Corps League. Extremely active in the Marine Corps League, both here at the local level. We have one detachment here in Harvard County, the Corporal Pete Arnold Detachment, and I'm active at the state level and at the national level. So the Marine Corps League keeps me busy. I'm also the coordinator for the local toys for tats program here in the county. That's pretty much my story. Been in the you know. So I've been a marine since nineteen ninety three and I've been in the Marine Corps league since I was a drilling reservists joined in nineteen ninety eight, so it's like twenty three years I've been in the Marine Corps League. The jarchial detachment was a nine back in nineteen ninety eight. They got chartered in two thousand and five. Okay, so I started out in New Jersey. I am currently a member. The Marine Corps League is different than like the American Legion roofw only because you're allowed to be a member of multiple groups. So I'm a member of five detachments. Wow. I've been the commonant of four of those five. I matter of fact, just joined a detachment in North Carolina. The SEWAN nicely detachment. Because I spend so much time at Fort Brag for work, I decided to join their local Marine Corley because I was doing. Realize you're traveling so more. Yeah, yeah, Hey, you and George's needed to love us. Yeah, always use a mate to go with me. Mate, all love. Hit him up. Mark, what do you got? Graduated Ninety two and I had to go into the delay, what did you call it, to the late entry country? Prue. Yeah, and wait, I think eleven months for aircraft maintenance, MOS job. And I'd wait like eleven months before I could go to boot camp to be in that Ms Damn boom of ninety two. I think I signed up to be a pully, mm and January or something like that. So I left boot camping parasol and November ninety two and I was an air winger. And I guess everybody here's probably a grunt or no, three something to the other, and here I'm damn right, aircraft maintenance guy. I just it really did a fit my fancy working on one airplanes. You know, I just thought it was a pretty exotic thing and glad I did it. And I got discharged honorably march of ninety seven and, kind of like Craig here, went for a federal job because you can buy back that, MMM, very time. But I did for years and now work at the Post Office Down Town Baltimore and ball back my military time and it counts towards your retirement. Yeah, I missay. How were you when you went to boot camp? I was well, I definitely was eighteen, but I think I was likely eighteen and okay, no, eleven and sweet. So I was the only thing went to boot camp. Missed my birthday, thanksgiving, Christmas, went to Marine Corps Ball. We all the sat in a squadron. We didn't get cake and...

...no squad bay and the squad bay didn't get any cake, but we sang the song. But yeah, I'm one of the youngest here, I suppose. But you know feel. Oh wait, Miste, so you don't get even now. You don't get birthday cake for November ten, just November eleven' Howur for KKE every November ten. I still haven't got one. All right, rich at them up. What do you got? I ain't nothing. Then I actually quit high school my senior year in May, took the test for the navy and at that time I was seventeen. So your parents would have to Cosign, not co sign, sign, for you to go into the military, and my dad was all for it because my dad was a getting recy squid. He's in the navy. He was a seal. At the time they were called frogmen. So when I went up to get the papers, a buddy of mine took me up. He was just so happened to be in the Marine Corps, and we got the recruitment officers. Of Women. I want to introduce you to somebody, and that's when I met Gunnie Jones. Came home with papers and joined the Marine Corps. My father went off refused to sign. So I turned eighteen June nineteen. June twenty one, I was on my way to Parris Island and for Year One thousand nine hundred and eighty one. So while my class was at high school graduating, I was, you know, on my way. Now it's either it's either Parris Island or San Diego or penalt is it San Diego? I went to Pendlton after Parris Island for infant but Parris Island and Penalton of the same other. No, no, but they are. They both basic from the Marines. No, just, yeah, you're only basic training is Parris, islent and San Diego. That's R I thought the I thought Penalton was was in San Diego. The penalty is a California. California. Yeah, they're both in California to well, yeah, I like San Diego is right on the San Diego Airport Tarmac. You literally, as you're flying in there there's there's mcrd Marine Corps record, that depot right there. You could sit in the airport and look at this. I was just there. But the training grounds for the Marines are Parris, ISL and only. No, Parris Ale and Sandago and Sandy. So what's it called in San Diego? That just during C R DC Diego, Digo, depending on what side of the DISSISSIPPI level, and if you live in the West or western side, you go to San Diego. On the eastern side you go to parasol, Parris ISMs actually the the it's not just the name of play, it's the name of the area. It's Paris, Paris and but that's that. I gotta said. That's the real it's the yeah, yeah, I don't think they had the sand fleas and the red fire ants and alligators and on see Diego. And just I mean so you're aware that you know both San Diego and Parasyl, and that's for we're enlisted marines. Go to bout camp, if you're an office here, actually will go through Quantico right in Virginia. The ones I went through, the marines that go through San Diego, we call them Hollywood marines. They get a shoot, sunglasses, yeah, exactly, and they walk around and flip flops. Yeah, so nice. In one thousand nine hundred and eighty one right when in it was honorably discharge eighty seven. Loved it. I didn't want to get out, but I just wanted a different duty station and they want to give it to me. So I got out, actually enrolled and took the test fir State Police Academy and now I'm active. You know, I'm in the American Legion. And just I just love talking to people in the military, especially other Marines and the guys I served with. A lot of them we still stay in touch. My best friend lives in Italy. Got Another buddy that lives in Wisconsin, which and for some reason he's a rich skins fan. That when I don't get HMM, but it's a brotherhood. I mean, I mean a guys craned me if I'm wrong, but do you guys still talk to a lot of people you served with? You know, through facebook. I mean you know, when I got out of Marines and the Cherry Point North Carolina, know, you just got a hodgepods of people come from every yeah, this, Florida, wherever. You never see these guys again. When they started doing facebook. You started looking up one and he's friends with another and then he's friend of another and the next thing you know, yeah, you're HMM to California. So actually, I think, I hope before facebook got there, is marines do or Militarycom, which is like a social media safe strictly from military, and that's how I hooked up with some of the guys I served with. But now I was a three hundred eleven infantry, which I'm glad I was, because does to me. If you go in infantry, it just...

...everything is wide open for you. There's so much you get to do, so many different things, you get to do, places to go. Now that's that. That's your battalion. Is that coming saying? I right when you when you announce MOS. Yeah, but now my Batalien. I was in Thurbitani Second Marines, the Evil Ie. That's the last. We'll say it again. What what infantry was it? Therbitanian, Second Marines. We're got to teach him all. Yeah, it's not the evil eye, which is the I can your Ms. is your job? Right, you're right, occupacionals. It was infantry. Was a rifleman, ore eleven God and which, technically, yeah, grunt, everybody is a rifleman when they graduate ground pounder. But the group that you're in where? That changes, though? Yeah, that changes, because my first duty station was an evil weapons station Eurro Open, Jersey, and there we stood guard. We stay in guard of at a navy base. That was always did, which actually there were a lot of deer up there, which we ate good sometimes. But when you when you meet another marine and like how does it go? Hey, what's that? What's The honer? What's the interaction look like? It's always what's your own? This much, I mean yeah, after you talk for a while, we do um, a story served. I mean the first thing, first thing, wants to see each other's like a simper five brother and all that. And just what's Yournd Mosk where? I did you serve? Yeah, where'd you go to? Paris, home, we where'd you get to? Where were you? Yeah, remember that. You know. What play? What places did you go to? You know, did you go overseas? Stuff like a tall bent, all of the all the different things, because, I mean that's the one thing a lot of people join because they want to travel, and I was fortunate I did. I didn't get to go to as many places as a lot of people, but I was able to go to Guam, tenny and Japan, Alaska briefly, basically stopped in say hi. But I mean you travel everywhere and to be able to eat the different cuisines in the different countries is just mind blowing. I love it. What delicious of our's. Yeah, coming, no, I'm talking about what your no, no, no, dude. Well, we've hate. That's how I learned. How this learned to cook was from the Mr telling you swapping stuff out to make hamburgers with the MRI stuff. Not Do what we used to do. We were doing training in the Mahabbi and we called rattlesnake and we actually cook the rattle sneak or to fire and mix that up with the LASAGNA MRI. Yeah, I was a lot like you. I mean when, you know, like I told you, I didn't turn twenty three until boot camp. So I went to college, dropped out, worked full time, went back to college for another year, dropped out and then was kind of sitting around New Jersey going what the hell am I doing with my life? Am I going to just work forever and then retire? Is that my life? Or do I want to join the military and go somewhere, you know, have them send me places and then you start, you know, investigating. Okay, well, what service do I want to join? You know, so my queen which is the best? So obviously I was led in the direction to join in the Marine Corps. Of course, as Marines were biased to that, you know, but I mean, you know, I looked at all the other services in both my father and my grandfather were army veterans. So, you know, I was like, well, you know, I maybe I wanted to one up them in my own mind, you know. So you know. But my dad was a Korean War veteran. My grandfather was actually a world war one veteran. Oh Wow, he served in the same battles that a lot of the Marines did in World War One. I've got a thing at home that lists all the battles that he were in, you know, and it's, you know, Moose Aragon and all that cool stuff that, you know, the Marines did in World War One. And I had no intention to join in the military. I was playing to the band when I quit high school. I knew I was going to be a rock star. Now my Dick told you the band. I can't. I came home, I del I joined a a late entry program, you know, and I said down with my parents at the kitchen table and I you know, and basically was like hey, I joined the Marine Corps. My Dad looked at me goes, what the hell do you do that for? You know, it is like I got to get out of here, you know, I got to go do something. Yeah, I mean so, at least my experiences when I was in high school working for a good year changing world tires and whatever. I was like there's got to be something better than this minimum wage, dirt crap job that I so we joined the Marine Corps. Get paint even less. airplanes. Yeah, that's cool, you know, and it's to travel. But when you move, when you move from assignment to assignment, you change battalions. Okay, you were in the three series, I know, but...

I have a completely different story. But you get rolling on yours and we'll come and tell you my I got my young special so I went, who are you? My name is George would. I'm half asleeper. I went in one thousand nine hundred and eighty four and my the buy back story is I wanted to prove my proved myself to myself and everybody else, basically because everybody said you'll never make it. I was a I was a whim, but was beat up, bullied, but my father was a marine and everybody in my all the men in my family, were marines. My cousins were marines. I had a cousin kilt in Vietnam, has a marine and because of my parental circumstances and as a child, I wanted to prove myself, be quite honest with you, because everybody's everybody who knew me then said you'll never make it because I was I wasn't there. I was I was a WHIMP, scared to death on my own shadow so I went in. I graduated in one thousand nine hundred and eighty four from guardchmanship, curly and within I don't know how long. It wasn't very long, there it was. I went in, enlisted in the rink corps and everybody laughed at me, said I wouldn't make it that, as you could tell, I'm six five right, big guy, and and so I remember, I can still see it, the recruiter coming. It was like five o'clive o'clock in the morning, pouring down rain and him walking in with that gray overcoat. Remember that? MM, it's gray overcoat and pick me up to take me to go to maps. MMM. So I want to Parasilon and it legitimately was hell on earth. I loved it, but they're it literally like flipped a switch off in my mind and it made me because I think somehow like the one thing that nobody knows is like these draw instructors, these they're like their psychologists. Oh Yeah, they can read you and they know what your weaknesses are and they play on them because they want to unlock you. So what they figured out was I was timid and they were because I was timid to fight. Well, you guys remember Pugle pugle sticks. Well, I not want everybody usually goes man on man pugle sticks. What they wanted to do with me was show me that I wasn't going to die. So I never once fought any one on one. The weas put me on two and one, on two and three. So and they always end up. What they did was they meet, they flipped a switch in my mind to go from very passive to overly aggressive. So I came at a parasolum like one and blood right. I was a classic, like a cure. Still to this day with my our senior drop, we should talk about drum senior drawing structors to drawn starters. I could still to this day tell you the chant. We used to do a chant every night before we hit the rack bed. Yeah, I can tell you staff starred Martin. That was my senior drone trucker. Devil dogs, sharp troops, blood sucking war machines, ready to fight, ready to kill, ready to die, but never will. Three Times Devil Dog, sharp troops, blood sucking war machines, ready to fight, and it get in your mind right. So what happened was I was at my father was a tanker. Thank the talion. My recruiter said sure, yeah, you're a tanker critter. Tell you anything to get signed up. I'm, thank Joe, six foot five. The maximum height for a tanker is five foot nine. So I show up the second tank battalion at was Le June. I swear to guide this is a funny story. I show up the second tank battalion at Campbell June, North Carolina, which is a huge base, and I'm standing there private. I was a private standing there. Huh, you know, Sur Sur and the the I go to report in the sergeant major and he's going it's a fucking joke. Goddamn fucking Joke Gone Ay. It's a fucking your boy, who are you? What the Fuck Gone Ay? And he gets me and he goes, who the hell gave you these orders? Boy, you can't, you'll be you'll kill us all. Boy, you got about a thirty second life expectancy and I freaking take you. We would all die because of your ass. God. He scream into the gunny. So I they wind up because I had the test scores. They said you could do one of two things. To all the to all the three eleven grunts out there. That's roamrine corps, grunts, infantry. You got choice. You could go to Kim Gaiger and be a grunt or you could go to kobalt computer school. I want kobalt computer school. I don't want to be a grunt. So by the time I graduated from Kobalt Computer School, Kobalt, the language, cobalt for computers, was gone. It was already gone. So so I had been. I had...

...been a weightlifter, weightlifter and being six of five, they said we got the best place for you. You're going to Dorston in DC. They sent me to Georgia to be a bodyguard and I want to be in a bodyguard for the common on the rink corps, in the assistant comment on the drink corps at headquarters and Rine Corps. You were stationed in Ethan I. Oh, okay, okay, eighth and I eighthan eyes were the sound. You ever want to see something, you got to see the seal auction drol team. It's not silent auction drilled silent sounds. Now you got business on your vibe. I'm do silent off solid. You gotta see it. You got to see it is secredible around the Ewigiana Memorial. It's incredible. So P eighth and eyes here and then headquarters and Marine Corps at the Department of Navy about up on the hill from the Pentagon. So when the Pinacot hit with the plane, I remembered east that river entrance. It's called the river. So I used to take go back and forth and travel with them and run with them and run documents back and forth. We were at Henderson Hall right on the wall of Arrington National Cemetery, so you always hear that boom boom. They'd be doing the parate for the burying people. So I was a I was a bodyguard for them right for the common out and assistant common out for a couple the generals and I worked for Ali North. When Alid worth got kicked out of NSA, I was his bodyguard. And then I got I want the Okinawa, which I love that can. I Love Them. I love the CAN now. And then I went to Korea. But you're talking about emery's man. Do Team Spirit. Do you remember Team Spirit? It's it's called brave warrior, brave something. Team Spirit was back. So what it was was they would take the career the South Korean's and they would draws them up like bad guys and it was just an it was a fake war to show North Korea Team Spirit. MMM Yeah, I mean I was there at the say yeah, except when I was there in Korea they were not allowed to call a team spirit because North Korea was rattling their saber just like they do today. So they held the same exercise but didn't call a team spirit and they helds. That was in the s one. So it was every year. That was and Korea was, oh God, bless their stuff. I could tell you about Korea that I came, but I want the team spirit. Want the Korea, Pohng Korea. And then left there and came back to Okan. Allen the got discharge, sent the Penalton, waiting discharge, honorably discharge from from the rine corps, came back and started applying for the Maryland State police and became a state trooper for twenty years. And so I had my four years military time, rink more time and then twenty years state police time. And Hmm, what'r Your Mos can change and your but oh yeah, your battalion can change several times. Oh God, Yah will that's how much trying to get up when you know you can. You can't change hermine. I think, what after four years? Yeah, it's harder to do. I mean depends on depends on what you know. Yeah, sometimes you're reinlist and you'll reinlist and part of the thing will be like well, we're going to train you to go do this, or his MS disappears. All of a sudden there's an MLS that goes away. Now we need to plug you in over here because at ms no longer so they will plug you in there now does now? Do you guys have a infinite our lifetime connection to your graduating class? No, God, no, no, I can. I but you don't have any loyalty. You don't have any loyalty or connection to a specific battalion or graduating class. ME. To me, I think are my loyalty. I could like these guys are still in touch with the people they went through. I don't talk to anybody I want through the Marine Corp with they still do, but we I personally, I can say from me personally, like I have a infinite lifetime oath to to the Marine Corp. Yeah, and everything about the mark, because I want to tell you, and I mean necessary with all certainty, I was a state trooper for twenty years, but I'm only who I am today because of the Marine Corps. Everything I owe is to the Marine Corps. I don't told anybody I went to Paris alm with, because you really don't. Your drill in structures are so so much in your head. There's only one guy I remember from from boot camp and that's because his last name was the same as mine. And the only reason I remember him is because I think after week there he started crying. He wanted to get out. And you remember the bear extend. There three levels, so when you first go down there you're on the third floor. So he did all Kinsci of stuff to try to get dad. He jumped. He jumped from the third floor, either window, Bar, I can't remember. All you did was broke his arm. So he's in Sick Bay for a while. They want to discharge him. No, I'm sorry, he did now. No, so then they then he drank the bottle of whisk he was a sick bay again.

No, he kept coming back to the platoon. All well, but it was the finally, the third time that. Keep in mind this was an eighty one. He signed papers stating that he was gay. So that's how he got out. But that's the only guy I remember now when I was at naval weapons station, because that's your once you get to sent to your main duty station, those are the guys you remember. Once I get to camp. Was June at. That's I remember all those guys. It was. Those are the guys I still talk to you to this day. That's got something to do with maybe you're M Moss. I mean you had a probably a security clearance, and and your group of people that you associated with, Walt M guard, the Common Apple, was probably very small and very professional. Not a lot of goop and NORF with you. And, like I said, your time and you come across marines. Did what years you were in really kind of DICTA. Yeah, what happens, but marine, I guess you'd say, or whatever. And I still remember bunch of guys from boot camp that were it was almost like those movies to me seem kind of realistic because we remember film mettal exact all we heat had one of knuckle hey that was steal an apple from the freaking channel haul, put it in his foot locker and that mean. And then whoever had fire remember fire watch. Yes, they beat on the dyes, hatch and say, some guys out here eating apple three in the morning. We're all up, running freaking down the street and are freaking underwear or whatever, because it's knuckleheads eating Yelp, all kinds of stupid you know, didn't make their bread. You remember, the knuckleheads to screw up. Yeah, guys that were afraid to get up out of the rack in the middle of the night go to bathroom, squad leader or any kind of M and that person was in your squad. Him and all the people that are associated with him get the shit beat out of you. So yeah, I remember, said these guys because of the trauma that or whatever. But I was an air linger and we had a lot of good times, because when we're are wingers, I mean going to different places, drinking, party and whatever. So yeah, the facebook thing, I remember and I'm friends with a bunch of them and it's good. I like, you know, to twenty two a day. Yeah, every once in a while I'll see somebody post something that you know they're going through a bad time and you know whatever called instant message or Messenge them privately, you know, and talk to him and whatever, and it's because it might be one day a year to having a bad day and you want somebody to you know, lean on. So well, maybe maybe somebody talk about you. and En list at such a young age and what an important decision for a young person to make, not knowing how it's gonna change the rest of your life. Do they do a do they do a proper job? Like George said, sure, what we'll get, we'll get you in the what were you calling it? The tanker? You know that they just want you in. You know they just want to recruit you get in. You know they'll tell you anything to get you in. But there, I mean they're essentially changing your life for the for the better. But I mean it sure is a serious decision there to see if they're ready for this or no. I think they. They're so hard to get people in their eyes, if you make it there, if you don't, won it. But it all depends. Not Not not every year. They were hard up for to get people in because there were sometimes there's a long ass waiting list. This is what I think the recruitment. They're just taking warm bodies. Yeah, but the the mold. The ones they can can the mark. The real mark is the ones that can get through with background and all all this stuff. The real mark is is is boot camp. Yeah, if you could get through boot camp, I mean then, when I was there, you weren't getting out, you were in. Yeah, they would recycle your ass and you get out. Now, Oh God, you well, they change it. And now, if I think you could raise like a job, you can quit if you don't, if they don't get it, if you're guaranteed to most and they don't give it to you, or aren't you a law to quit or something, it's reach a contract. Well, so the first six months that you were in any branch in the military that you can technically get out of the military by doing certain things. Like we had people in boot camp who would basically say I refused to train. And you know, that happened in the very first time that happened to a recruit. You know, they brought the MP's in, they handcuff this guy up and they left with this guy, you know, and so we're all freaking out. Well then, you know, down the road, like a month later, he gets put in like the you know, the I can't remember what battalion you...

...know, was a platoon or whatever that they used to cycle people out when they're processing your paperwork. So, you know, we all thought this guy was in the brig and then we just see him walking around, you know, just whatever, you know, like at Church or wherever it was, you know, and I'm like, you know, you like, what are you doing? And he's like, Oh, yeah, they just transfer you over here after that, you know. And so all of a sudden that was like an eye opener. I'm like, Oh see, you can quit, which you know, but you're not sent tone right away. No, no, no, and it's and it's a blemish on your record. You know, you will get a general discharge after you get out. So it's not an honorable discharge. But this thing, it pisses best that, especially now. I'm I who. I hope I'm wrong, but I don't think I am, because I've seen guys where they'll go in, they don't even make it all the way through boot camp and their discharge the general did. It's not a dishonorable discharge and they'll still tell people that they are marine, they're veteran. You're not a marine until you graduate BOOT camp. That's when you're handed the Eagle Globe and anchor. That's when you become a true Mari and that's that's one of the things that pisses me off. I had somebody tell me that as I think they got that on a medical discharge or whatever. It's like, Dud, you did even graduate. You're not a freaking marine anchor. Yeah, yeah, okay, that's that's like. That's it for us. So when you're able to wear that, that's it. That's when you become, when you that's when you become. And I'll never forget because a graduation I went up to my drilling strugger and I said, well, you know, thank you. Sorry say they call me Sir. You're a marine now, because you know, you don't call a noncommission officer, certain unless you're in boot camp. After that the only ones you call Sir are the officers sub Marines. In boot camp we call we're technically recruits. It is different in the other branches of service. When you join the army you're immediately called a private. I mean like day one, and who can't? They're like private it over here, you know. Well, in the Marine Corps you have to earn that rank. So you're not a private until you graduate. So you're a recruit the whole time you go through boot camp. He was talking about people being recycled. I graduated with a Marine who spends six months in boot camp because he because he got hurt. He hurt his head, broke his leg, and they have they have a PCP, you know, they like a physical conditioning platoon, and they have a MED platoon. So you get dropped in Med platoon, you're there for a while till you heal, then you get put in fishing physical conditioning platoon so you can get yourself back up to speed, and then you get dropped back into a new unit, you know, a new a new platoon. I mean there's units, there's platoons, there's battalions, there's MOS has true or whatever I was in. We go to a squadron. It's Hanger Vma to twenty three was my squadron, and that would be like, I don't guess, your battalion or whatever. You know, you guys are we in Third Marines, FORMO, be may two, twenty three, and that's all there is. But for a but for a young person, because I know when I was younger. You know, when you're in your early s or late teens and and you graduate high school and you've got this life ahead of you and it's like, well, what am I going to do with my lun you know, and and your and you enlist and I guess a lot of these, like you said, recruits, get in and and they realize maybe I made a bad decision. But you're but what you guys are saying is what, once you're in, they're not letting you go. Oh, not when in eighty four very difficult. It's very difficult to get out. But but, but isn't there a little bit of, you know, the sympathy there? I mean, you're asking a young person to make a serious decision. But you know what I mean? Follow me here a little bit. Right, a young person, I mean when I was in high school and I didn't know what I wanted to do with the rest of my life. I late S. right, you know. But but what for a young person to make? Didn't we all make bad decisions we were young? But yeah, gave him an out. So many people. If you said okay, look like. Oh you could do is I refuse to train and you go home on the next flight. Leave them Parris Island. If you gave them on out and it was that easy, they wouldn't stick through it. You know, I mean you constant. You got to motivate yourself to stay in that. So if there was just I throw up a white flag and so I can go home now like well, but you think for the most part the older marines would look at that young person and say, hang in there, it'll be the best decision you ever made in your life. The other thing is to the big difference from back then and now in high especially kids in high school. One thing that's constantly and we talked about this on the other podcast before, about the trades and all the one thing that's constantly being pushed down their throats is college, college, College, College. You don't hear them talking about the military as much. Sure it goes so have recruiters...

...come in, but it's not talked about as much and you know some people would it. One of the reasons I wanted to start this podcast because there are a lot of people that decide they want to join and the either taught recruiter, which is a salesperson, basically, that's what it is, or going to tell you what you want to hear. He's a salesman. Are Getting some yeah, now they may been like me, George, Craig and mark before they were recruiters. They go back to being like I was again after the recruiter recruitment part is done. But the other thing you see is so many young people are talking to people that never served and getting their ideas. A lot of them don't talk to people that are in or that have served, and I think that's as yeah, yeah, or to watch the movies. You want to see how the marine corpies, watchful men, were like that. George's for George's your your situation. You've got your grandfather, you've got family members that were marines. So at least you have a little bit of, you know, encouragement and direction there. No, there was no encouragement. No, is all right. My family's military too. There was no incursion, but I mean when surely you went to a family member and said Hey, I'm thinking about enlisting, they didn't give you any sort of advice? Or my father said I wouldn't make it. Yeah, I mean it was a when I was in high school it was a my threat was I'll either be digging ditches or I'll have to join the army, and my dad was in the army. I mean, you know, he's like those. You're going to be your two choices if you don't go to college. It's why I you know, in a sense I wasn't ready for college. I mean I had a great one year of college. I was fantastic life experience, but I certainly was not ready for college. You know, I was seventeen when I went off in September to go to college. So nowhere near ready to go live at college for a year. You know, where has taken a break or doing something else would have been what I should have done, you know, and too many of these young people today they don't understand, you know, they don't have the focus. You know, talk about trades and things like that. There are a ton of jobs in the military that can put you on them. Have train to be a tradesman, so I combat engineer. I'm a carpenter. They taught me how to do that in the Marine Corps. So you know, you know, that's one of the things that I can do. I've built a whole bunch of different structures while I was in the Marine Corps. So jact. Okay, I'll say this as a father of a son who want to college. University of Maryland. Now colleges is like doesn't promise you anything. Inside high school it's like a high school degree or high school. To point the young, young kids that are eighteen nineteen in that seventeen, eighteen nineteen, like I always say, like the best thing now is like what you do targe. He'll does right instructure. That's where they if you want to make money, that's where it's not college anymore, because college doesn't guarantee you anything. No, it literally my son that has still in our college staying for for twenty years. Yeah, Mike's my son, is still going through college debt and he came out of college, one of the best colleges in the country, with making it, making a very meager living at ninety eight rock right. So what I'm saying that didn't guarantee you anything. So to me, the right now, if you don't want to go to college, the best thing for you to do is going to military. I don't think there's any out and only that because after you get out of military, was it the Gi bill that they still have or something like that? So when the college, when I was in Frink, you can go. Yeah, you go college while you're in or even when you get out. They will pay for you. On my associate's degree. I got my associate's degree while I was in an I thank you now with the yeah. And after a couple of years and worked towards a degree or whatever. And then you get this degree and they put you into a warrant officer program then you become a commission offer, second lieutenant, Captain, whatever. You start out as like an enlisted off shirt NA chief. One of absolutely you mentioned before that it's not a valuable option for high school kids. They deceive boom college. I got to Google Holl and know there is an alternative and maybe they ought to push it more or at least exposed kids to it more. Well, it's been. The problem is today it's all this lovey touchy Peeley Salt Kind Look Gentler, you know, don't be offended. That's what like. Then you don't get a partisans in tropiate to drink here like then. With the stuff. Like I say, I have a scar on my neck for whatever my senior draw instruct are like finger hit me in the throat. Yeah, all right, and it cut my throat with its fingernails. So then, you know what, it's still not real Marine Corps like when my mother was there. Yeah, they're not allowing me who you buy your neck? I think that. I...

...mean I remember when I was growing up, the the things that I remember about the military was the the night vision screen at Desert Storm. MMM that that was like my first record. My first memory of what what war and military was like was an NBC shot of Anti Missile Fire, you know, night visions. I mean, I think that. I think war is scary. It is scary. It's scary and it wore. Is No joke. Like that's like no joke. Let me finish, but I think that. I think that when you ask a young person to join the military, and I maybe they don't understand the the military as a whole. It's much more than war. It's much more than war time, you know, but I think, I think there's that stigma or, you know, you follow me on the yeah, no, I've follow you now. And he says there's no place for warm and love and you know all this. You know, so it might. You know, it could be a tough decision for a young person. Take it from me for a minute, though. There's something inside everybody that calls you to do something like this. Okay. So, like it called me to the rink corps and it called me into the Maryland State police for twenty years. So it's like you have a you have an oath to serve. It's like programmed in you. Right. I to this day, to the day, everything I owe is to the Marine Corps, even after being a trooper for twenty years. Right. So you may. You may see the like I was in the I was in the State Police Academy. When you watch that footage, I remember we were I was in the academy when Desert Storm was happening for the first time. So, yeah, here's the here's the crazy part of it. War Is is scary. It's scared to you, but you're ready for US marines crave it. We crave it because you go through training and that's all you want to do. These raw instructors your brainwashed. You are brainwashed. But did that's there's an and there a negative stigma with brainwashing and and hungry for killing and war and right. Well, what would would you want somebody who's not like that to go to war? Now? I mean no, but here's the but here's the difference too, and this, I think this is where some people get confused, because you say killing and war and all that, and it's I want to put it, I want to turn it around a minute. Don't look at it as killing and war. You're there to protect your country right, fight for their freedom. For everybody here, you're there. They're mentally, you know, training. You know what. What's the chant? You know, the dog structures bout sucking war machines, Ltd sucking war machines. You know, but it is. Is that mentally it is it healthy for a life after service? I think so, because, yeah, it is. I'm talking. I'm not just talking about, you know, entrepreneurship or how you attack life. Is it healthy for the for the empathetic, sympathetic, loving, caring person, that side of each person after they get out of service? I would say for a majority of them. Not necessarily for everybody, but for a majority. Yeah, I mean, you know he could, because you know, your dad says you're not, you're not going to make it if your dad, when it came to you and said son, looked at you and said you can do anything you put your mind to. Would if my father told me that, I probably wouldn't have made it. Yeah, I made it's interesting, right, because I made it because my father told me. He refused to sign. He told me I would never make it in the marine and you wanted to prove your dad wrong. That was I remember you this sis ever, taught me without team city sitting like you guys, remember when we goold write letters, right? Yeah, when your foot locker right, I can remember setting on my foot locker crime eyes out, crime eyes out, and circling the tears on the one the circle and saying that's a tear, that's a tear. I can remember circling it while I was writing the letters, because you got out. There's I got a goes back to my background. I mean I was I was not treated very well as a child. So scared to death the fight, because that's all I did was run from my parents and everybody else. So if you remember the last thing we talked about ptsd and all and stuff, it's the began with my parents. So the Marine Corps thank God for the Marine Corps. For me, I didn't go in to be loved, I went into say I'm up, Damn Man, not only my amm'm marine, because you died good. You don't get any more badter ass than a marine. And the the the pride of the Marine Corps. What is what carries you through? It builds a foundation. You know, it's built the foundation. Want to flip that on, you know, so we gotta, you know, Charity Fund raising. So you're you know, that's there's a there's a...

...ton of love in that and caring. This, you know, toys for thoughts, you know, so I got. Maybe I'm just I'm just sparking conversation about you know, I'd me. To me, it's to me. It would have taught me I could. To this day, I can remember like with that my thoughts. Weren't it through my mind when we were running around the Damn parade field? What running and going over in they called the Rose Garden, you guys remember, and the dust doing doing? What is it? The push outain climber, masstufimers. I can remember what I was thinking when this was happening. It teaches you you could get, you could dig you could find depths in your soul that you never that these guys know how to tap into. So what happens is you come out of there with like a guided mission in life where now I did that, I can do anything. I could get through anything. Yeah, adults, I mean you were talking about the war and PSD in the trauma and some people may be cut out. There's a lot of jobs and you know, the military. We're talking about the marines, but the air force, army, maybe whatever. They got people to fly drums and you know, there's medical people in different fields. Not Everybody has to be a grunt. Well, I mean and in war time, when we when we're in war, I mean and we set up, I mean it's a whole municipality. There's people that clean the bathrooms or people that make the roads, electricians, you know, when it comes down to you know, the last one there to help get people out of the situation that we got in. So, yeah, you're still away from them, but you know, there's plenty of occupations in the military as a whole. Was a military as a whore. You know, grand patterns you were enduring. Does a storm right? No. So that's kind of funny. I actually tried to join in March of one thousand nine hundred and ninety one, which was right act as. And guess what, the Marine Corps was full, because everybody tried to join the military and they were all patriotic back then. And you know, and in my recruiter was like, oh well, you know, come back and see me. Never called me. And two years later I went back to the same recruiters office and I and I probably got the stupidest recruiter ever, but that's that's a different side story. Just because, you know, I happen to walk in. He was the one sitting in the chair right. You know. I mean one of the things I'll say is, I mean I know tons of well adjusted and very productive combat veterans. I'm not a combat veteran, but being part of the Marine Corps League, I just know tons of those guys. You know, and I think a lot of the kids today. You know, it's an all volunteer service. So less than one percent of America serves in the military and then when you think of how small the Marine Corps is, we're a tiny sliver of that one percent that are marines. And so there are a number of reasons why people join, but a lot of people want to volunteer to help people. That's why they join and and in when you're in combat or you're deployed, you want to make sure that the marine to your left and the marine to your right they come home with you. That's who you're worried about. You know, you're not. You're trying to help the community. You know I mean and I you know, doing some of the stuff that I've seen, you know, working as a as a comp defense contractor with the government. You know, I've been in touch with boots on the ground. Where I've never been personally to Afghanistan or Iraq, I would be on tons of teleconferences and video conferences with people that were right there and the things that we were doing here at Aberdeen Proving Ground, we're making a difference to the boots on the ground, the tip of the spear, guys that were out there doing the mission, you know, and they're they're trying to help the civilians and you know, and again, all the hard work that that that the military put in in Afghanistan falls apart. Why? Because the government, just like you know, Vietnam, the south, you know, the South Vietnamese government couldn't maintain what they were doing way back when they fell apart, they fell apart slower than Afghanistan did. Afghanistan, the government, I mean the president, left in like two days and it just collapsed on us. So, you know, it was a horrible way for us to exit Afghanistan. But you know, I am sure that those marines that have served over there, they did everything in their power to try and make the country a safer place. And if those, you know, if those people in Afghanistan don't want to step forward and kind of help themselves, you know, there's historic preferent precedence over the last thousand years that it's kind of tough to have an outside force governed Afghanistan, you know. I mean everybody's tried to conquer them and it's not worked. So you know, I mean we didn't do you know, we were there for twenty years and...

...then left and it fell apart. We gave them the building blocks to do good things and they didn't do it. But and there those at work with every country. No, I mean it's no. And especially when you get into country. You were there, they're focused more are religion than anything else and they still live back yeah, the holy word, they still live back in there's well, one of the you. So one of the reasons, one of the things that I tell my wife, I say, one of the reasons why I think we've had a little bit of problem, like with Afghanistan, verse like how we did Korea and how we did Vietnam, was back then the servicemen brought home spouses from those countries and those true and those spouses lived amongst us, they were your neighbors and you're like, you know what, so you couldn't see every Vietnamese person as a horrible person, right, because you're like, well, that's my neighbor, his wife is fantastic, I know her personally well. We weren't allowed to do that in either a rack or Afghanistan. There's there's very there's probably a few of that fat type of stuff happening, but you're not seeing service members come home with a spouse. So that's we're not getting to we're not getting to meet them, we're not getting to understand what their life was like over there. So it's a different dynamic today than it was back in the past. I mean just even World War tethers about world war to think about how many people married German brides, Italian brides, and they were the enemy for the longest time and all of a sudden that's your you know, your best friend's wife is, you know, from one of these countries you were fighting and you have to get over that. And that's true. You know, whatever schoolers, whatever in the military or whatever where. And you heard the news about the thirteen marines that didn't make it out of there, and I'm curious to see if they feel that they, if they were in that position, would they be left like those thirteen marines that were left over there? And maybe that's what influences or decisional like. No, I'm not joining, and look with these you know, they left these guys back there and its yeah, yeah, and that's the difference between the difference between the government and the military, because we never leave saw it. We never leave anybody behind, but the government don't care about that. Yeah, I think the lack of the lack of integrity and journalism is really, really damaged all society. And Jake time, what you circle back around your point caring and nature and all stuff. The military's there to train you to protect your country, Sert your country. There is no caring factor. Right. What happens is you, but you gotta understand too, is you get one thing in boot camp, then you come back out and basically you're working a job for three, for three and a half years. Right, you've got a job. So you get back to the normalcy, right, the normalcy of life, and then rolls change, roles of engagement change, and you know, I wasn't. You know, I didn't see any I wasn't like he said, I wasn't a wartime marine. Know, I was just a marine. So I had a job for three Ma if three, four years. Right. So should should military service be mandatory? I think it should be mandatory for anybody that serves as governor or even senator or definitely president. I think should be. That's the one thing that's always irked me. I don't see how someone I can be commander in chief if they never served. You know what's funny is is you if you would have caught me about four years ago with this question, I would said yes. But when my son graduated high school, I did not want him doing two things. I didn't want him being going into military because he was going to get killed because of Afghanistan. I won't see my child killed and I didn't want to be a police officer. Thank the Lord, because he even got worse since then. I wanted him to do what he did, going to the college. So my answer is I think that there should be some sort of compulsory service, not just a military but the military would be a component of it. There's already a group called Americorps, you know. So you know, maybe you have to give a year or eighteen months of service to Americorps or you join the military, you know, for four years. But you have to see, you have to serve America. You have to give back as a citizen of this country. You need to give back act and so there are there are options for people that don't want to go to combat or let you know, for instance, I have three kids...

...and my youngest son, who's eighteen now, is not medically qualified. He's got it arthritis in his back. He wouldn't qualify from military service, you know. So for me that's upsetting because he's somebody that could benefit from that, but I can't get him to a recruiter because they he'll be rejected. You know. So, you know, he graduated high school and I said I am not sending you off to college, you are going to take a year off and we're going to figure your life out, because I know what happened in my own personal life. You know. I have another son who's about to graduate in May from college. And then my oldest son, you know, he did the working thing, he did the tough thing, he didn't go to school and he kind of floundered around, but now he's, you know, almost twenty six and you know, his life is on track, engaged. I've already got two grandkids and things are you know, he's got a house. I mean, things are moving in the right direction. So all three of my kids, none of them join the military and they all took different paths, you know, but I think some sort of compulsory service would have been beneficial. You know. So if I could sit tell my son, hey, go do this for two years or go you know, there's there's groups out there like team Rubicon, who does disaster relief, you know. So when there's a hurricane come through Louisiana, these guys suit up and they're the ones that are down there with the chainsaws and they're helping do all this stuff. You know, maybe you have to join a group like that and give service back, but if you need to be, you know, if you want to be a citizen of America, you need to be able to give back to America, and that way people would understand like, oh well, maybe I should vote now and maybe this is this is how a society works. I have to give back a little bit because I live in a free country. See, and I think this is where the schools are missing out, because to graduate high school you have to have so many community service hours. So I think what they need to do is implement something like you were talking about into those community service hours, even if it's even if they're volunteering at a local legion or like Perry point, you have veterans hospital or something like that, something where they're involved with either act of military or veterans. And I we have a lot of I signed a lot of paperwork for choice for tots. For that there you got another one, choice for tots. I think that's I think that will give, I think I give kids a lot more appreciation, not just for the military before the country as well and other people. A lot of kids don't volunteer at all. You know, there's a lot more to the military than just shot in and just shooting guns. Yeah, and and being in war. And I think that that's, like I said before, the I think that's the American media's Misrepresentat or not. Maybe not, maybe not misrepresentation. It's just what they focus on when you hear about the military and about mandatory service whatever. Of It is world over, or I don't know how it happened, but we had to Bosnia, Somalia, thing going on some reason. I was one aircraft carrier to sent us to Nevotine, Israel, and apparently there's a like a joint forces base where, you know, the American and in Israel, soon as you turn eighteen, your manner you have to join. Do I think, a minimum of two years. Yeah, and we were seeing like Tel Aviv and different areas. There was like eighteen, seventeen year old is rare, old citizens standing guard with the gun. That's that works over there, but this is a fair one to work here. Yeah, and and they're fight and, like you said, earl I mean that's a religious war over there. So it's I mean, I'm a free kind. I've been Israel for other countries that are free, yeah, that that have mandatory so I've been to Israel, Israel to for for for a friend's wedding, and it's amazing the kids that are walking around strapped with a MP four submachine gun. Like I was. We were going somewhere and I went past a bus stop and there was a young girl in green with a submachine guns because they strapped to the chest, and she's at the bus stop going, click, taking selfies of her self. Click, and they're standing around all talking, kids talking, they don't got some machine guns strapped home. You know what, it's funny. While want to know the funny is, guess what was the one of the news. And that place was clean, there was no problems. It was beautiful. Is Jerusalem. That's where I was. I guess what was on the news. What they were talking about the dangers of bottomer city. They were showing Baltomer City in Israel and Israeli news about bottomer city. So what we're getting fed about Israel? They're getting fat about us. I love that. I thought the country was beautiful. I got a little freaked out one they were doing all the stuff in the towers and you know they were doing our team. Yeah, because you know if it...

...would ever work like a draft again, like Vietnam. Yeah, you got so many people that are such disarray about being a US ad mean they could they want to denounced or citizenship or whatever, with what you see some of this, you know, organizations and stuff like that. And for us to force them that I don't even know if you have to declare or your nose or your pledge your allegiance to this country anymore. And then you want to try to force them into the military. I mean they did, they do even say the pledge, pledge of allegiance in school, but you want to make them draft them into the military. I don't see that ever happening. I do like I love Craig's idea they some type of volunteer service or something. My daughter like on craigs that. She's seventeen now and I think there's so more year in high school they got to do some community service stuff, not necessarily anything outside. It doesn't even have to be outside of the school. Well, yeah, I mean, yeah, whatever, just like civics classes in high school. I don't know, let's flip this around from that. How do you feel about kids in school being taught a trade, going to trade school to be told how the talk construction, what you do? It's got to be harder for you to find people, younger people, who want to get into doing what you do, you know, and it is, and you know, a large part of our workforce. You know, it is Latino, you know, and that's just how that's just how it's been, that transition over the last twenty years and I think the maturity of the Internet, you know, and all the opportunity that the Internet as has brought to to young people. But yeah, it's hard. It's just I think that that I think twenty years ago, I think people kind of frowned on Latinos coming over here, you know, if they want to, and you can go that way down a rabbit hole on earning citizenship and you can talk about a legal border crossings and all that stuff, but when they get here they're grateful and they work hard as shit work. It's true. You know, they do, and it's and it's you know, and there's there's bad apples and every bond, but a majority of them that that work for us. You know that they're grateful, they work hard, they just want an opportunity to back. Yeah, that's fine, go down that rabbit hole. But how hard is it for you to find younger kids who want to do what you's told, want to drive a hammer? It's very hard. Up on a roof, it's hard. It's very they all geared toward keeping her hands clean and going to school. And like now, I pay a really good wage for people to work for us. I mean better than most. Right I can't find anybody wants to work and I pay a lot more than anybody else does and nobody wants to work. Not It's terrible for me to find people who want to work. Yeah, I think there's a there's a stigma out there and in society that, you know, working a construction job is, you know, kind of as you filter down, it's kind of you know, you hit the bottom and I'll just the labor grew for yeah, the military. It's like you. I mean I got like when you people in high school were saying that you wouldn't make it in this, that and the other. I got the stigmaitor like you couldn't go to you couldn't afford to go to college, you wouldn't have a maiden in college. This was your last resort and you ended up in the Marine Corps. You didn't want it, you just that's just the only place for you to go. And I think a lot of that, you know, a lot of it has to do with the kind of person you are and where you were raised. And you know where you're from. A divorced family, you know, yeah, scholary, half over her own drugs and they're wasted their lives and they have no jobs or they got six kids by a bunch of and their damn, your homeless and I'm doing pretty well for my God and I got to ask you, guys, a question is a question. This is a good question. What are you and I want to because I'm not going to give I'm not going to tell you to why I get it until I hear what you do. You believe that veterans, people who spent four years in the military service, should be treated better, definitely given it, given different things, because all the people that didn't let the people that you see on the side of the road with signs I'm a veteran, please help me, or you're a veteran, because this veteran should be able to given that. Do you believe that that's that that should happen? So I think, you know, veterans should help themselves. I mean you you know that type...

...of thing. I mean something led them down that path to say stand on the side of the road. But you know, I'm not going to complain if I go somewhere. You know, I'm not the guy that asked for ten percent discount, but if someone sees my hat and the like, are you in the military and they're going to give me ten percent at Home Depot or whatever? I'm not saying. I'm not saying. I'm saying I'm going to take that, but I was a veteran. He should be treated differently. Or there were a veteran. They that this. Do you think that that should happen? Should that be it should? Should people who are veterans be treated any differently given opportunities? Definitely do. You don't matter for all people that haven't served or well general. So yeah, and as far as you know, so I'm sure to stay. Police gives you veterans preference. I'm sure you know. The federal government gives you veterans preference. You know, a lot of a lot of places give you veterans Preference Job Wise, these homeless people, we got it, all these veterans that are on the street. They're all veterans, are all homeless. They should be. Veterans should be taken you know, given given this, given this opportunity, or given that opportunity. Do you feel like that's do you understand illegal? Yeah, yeah, but but then you're in an American citizen, though. American citizens should be given our preference. Are Right, I believe. I believe so. And here's the one of the things. I do believe that people, homeless, veterans, it doesn't matter. I think everybody here in the country should be taking care of first before let's say, we take care of like when others saying people from that, from the country, but not, I'm because, like the weather, the betters or whatever, they like to separate the veterans and saying veterans should be taken care of over top of everybody else, even on the Americans should I think bettering should have more benefits. Should people be treated differently solely on the fact that they served in the mill? Now, because, in all honesty, some veterans, like one of the things that we talked about this before one of the things that just doesn't irk me, but it kind of makes me feel uncomfortable, is when somebody thanks me from a service. Oh God, I yes, and they feel just because that's because then we let me tell you why people do that. Because, Pete, that's what we're taught, right, that's what we're taught. When you see, when you see somebody, you thank them for their service, because I I've heard multiple different things that that veterans love that, and then now I'm hearing it that they don't like it. Some do you know? So it's like we do. We thank you for your service and your sacrifice, because because then it gets it gets convoluted because me, thank you for thanking me. That's what I would say. Thank you for thinking me, because you have the you have this or not, or the the MOS where you're working a desk job or working on a computer, one marine and then you've got the other marine that's that's kicking down doors, you know. So it's like that does one service can more than you'll. Let me rephrase it. I think it's a we talked about this before, George. I think because you're a veteran, because you served in the military, I think people that have it almost feel like it's mandatory that they thank you, but they in turn will not thank the people that are doing more here, like the police, like the first responders, and there are a lot of people that have served in the military, but the people that police officers are fighting a war every day, every day, and that to me they deserve more appreciation than, say, a lot of your eventucus, I did a job, had a job for twenty four years. That's what I did. I had a job twenty four years, four years of Marine Corps and lesson. Every time I get her get up to do an auction and I'm in a setting where there's they're saying something about law enforcement or police or first responders or military, I would say I'm proud to say tell you that I was a marine and, like I just did one the other night for an organization called the fighters for freedom. Were the there was there was a there was a guy that was in the military there that was going through an in serious anxiety attack when he got there and he was bugging out of his mind. Well, they called me over here to go talk to him and, thank thank God, the right circumstances happened where I was able to help him and he calmed down. And then they're taking pictures, and I could show you taking pictures, and here's a guy was in the military, no arm, no leg, and he's got a service dog. I was humbled by that guy. Yeah, now, I was in the Marine Corps, but I'm humbled by him because he sees it. But at the same time I've helped other charities where one guy who was in the military, who signed up for the military, signed a contract, didn't get drafted. Whenever see he's got shot in the stomach and this guy wants a free house. He was everything. Free House, free car, free truck. They gave him a pull. He complained that it wasn't and so they gave him a cover. First...

...pull. I think I was like, I don't hated that. So coming from I'm a civilian, obviously if I see a veteran, I'm going to go around the room here. Do I thank them for a service? Yes or no? Yeah, well, I would yes, and let me tell you why again, I still think but it's not absolutely necessary. It's not absolutely necessary. I just think there's I think I'd like to see the appreciation go further to also the first responders. That's what I would really like to see. A as a as a state trooper for twenty years, and you two of you've known my role. I was on her cover for ten years. It would it help? What it shows me when somebody says that to me, when they say thank you for your service, and I always thank them for thanking me because it means more to me that you're that you recognize it, and that's what I and what I'll say to police officers is I'll say this is what it would I say, and I say when I can, I say thank you for your service. Yeah, I know it's not easy being a police officer these days. Now, yeah, that's it goes. Thank you for your service. I'm an air winger. I don't feel like like my life was a kind of like one the line enough for you to give me that kind of recognition, and that's what I was saying Earl I always feel that there are other other marines out there to that deserve. So I mean I take the thank you for your service because you don't you don't know me, but you know, I always feel like you know, I'm not an amptee. I'm you know, I wasn't combat wounded. So you know my service was you know, I was on court rinks in the COARS Marine Corps. I was just like I ate. I eat better than most people, every marine in the Marine Corps with Diet of enough MRI's. Did you really just go to people in the Air Force? No, a proper response will be your you can say, well, don't thank me for my service. I had a desk job. Thank him for his service because he was getting shot at every day. Well, you know, yeah, I guess the other way you could turn it around is, and I mean they people thank me all the time and yeah, I say you're welcome, but at the same time I'll turn around, especially if I see a veteran that I know is down on their luck. I guess I'm passing that thinks onto them. That's what you could say it. Why, when you say thank you for service, after they started doing all this Na, yeah, the same people that are now saying thank you for your service for going along with all that back then. Now that that they kind of realized vality, you don't see it no more. You know, we can get kind of stopped doing that. For some reason. Now they're thank you for us, like what you just saying. One, well, you know what I mean to. Let me say that's because here's what I get, all right. So when we go out to do auctions, and these both, both of these guys are from, we got take it. I do autograph signs with just about every athlete, every iconic athlete in the country. Right. I'd like seeing it now. And the reason why because a lot of those were just, what is the Wagon droppers jumping on the bandwagon, right, they had no idea what that was about. The whole thing started over police called Kaepernecker over police officers because of the the socks he was wearing. Do you remember the Sox he was wearing? It was a pig right. So it got it got to be a bigger thing. And then what I the only reason that you're bringing that up? I'd like hearing it and seeing it now because now people are seeing the importance of it and they're not they're off the wagon. They're off that bandwagon of it. Well, the importance of kneeling. Okay, listen to me. Okay, whole kneeling thing. Yeah, killed me, the me too. We killed me more when Ravens did it. In England. That's what killed me because, I'm sorry, did we fight far independence from England? Yesterday's game. Everybody's allowed their opinions to that. Everybody's now worked me more than you know because to me I didn't take it as an active thing against law enforcement, I mean against the dons. I took it as active against law enforcement, because nobody knows the real story. This could will get into the whole law enforcement thing. But what what I'd like hearing? I like it say because that means that they corpse lights cruing. Wonder that first I saw a blue kilt, but light sneak at recording we can say he's drinking a beer. So I just I I like hearing it because it just means that it means something to people. Yeah,...

...let me ask one more question. A young person comes up to you, can be a family member, and they say I'm thinking about joining the Marines. What do you tell them? Absolute best thing that ever happened to me personally. I would tell them you know my story of how it affected you know, I wouldn't be doing the job that I'm doing today had I not joined the Marine Corps. So everything in my life, you know, has gotten better since I joined the Marine Corps, you know, and I'm I'm still able to serve, you know, by doing things with the Veterans Organization, with the Marine Corps League. So I'm still very actively doing Marine Corps things and I'm helping Marines and I'm helping veterans. I'm helping the community doing toys for todds. So you know, and I will tell you somebody wants to join. None. You know, it was touched on before. So they have what's called the Post Eleven Gi bill that pays for four years of college at any state institution, whatever the cost is. So around the country, whatever it is in Texas they pay, whatever it is. Here in Maryland they pay and they also give your room and board stipend. So you do four years in the military, you come out, you go to four years of free college and now you have a degree, you're not in debt and you've got a skill while you're in the military and a skill while you were in college, and that would set you up for the rest of your life. And if you join when you're eighteen, you know you're in your mid s when you're done with four years on active duty and four years of doing stuff in college. Now you're ready for life, you know, at Twenty Five, twenty six years old, twenty seven, you know, that's you know, it's time to buy a house, it's time to get married or have kids or whatever you want to do. You know, but I just would absolutely recommend it, you know, and and again, depending on what that person wants to do. You know, are they a guy and it? You know, do they just want to, you know, be a trigger poller? No, three eleven tip of a spear. We need those guys. But the Marine Corps has computer guys, aircraft guys. Do you want to go work on planes and be a mechanic at Bwi? When you're done, go work and, you know, get it. Get an aircraft job. Eighty onyx. Then guess what? Then, when you're done, you can come back and work. COULD BE WI, or go be a combat engineer and learn construction. Now I've got a construction skill. I can come out. I go to school. I've not only learned how to build houses, but now maybe I learn how to design houses and all of a sudden, then, you know, you hire me to do something, you know, because now I've got a skill set. Both with the Marine Corps and what I learned in school. So and and the other thing is that post eleven gi bill will also pay for trade schools. So if you want to go to the police academy, they will pay. If you want to go to a Ben Hvac Guy, they will pay. So it's the same, you know. So what's it's creating opportunity. It's creating opportunities and the best thing that the military has done over the last few years is the things that you learn in the military, like avionics or if you're an electrician in the in the military, they have made those certifications. They're able to now transition into the military. When I was in, it was very difficult to transition your military skills to the civilian sector. Okay, but now you'll will get the same type of certificate in the military and then when you get out you're like, look, I already have my certificate. It's good all over the place and a lot of states will then say, okay, you've got one from the military, we're going to, you know, give you credentials here in Maryland to be able to do the same thing, or Texas or wherever you're from. So they've done a much better job at doing that. You talk about you know. Again, I'm partial to the Marine Corps, but you know, if you want to talk about the air force, you know, which will all joke about, is maybe the easiest service for you know, or the one to get the most. They get a lot of money, so they get a lot of good food, they get a lot of good barracks, they get a lot of good stuff. You know what, we're out in the field doing stuff. They're in the hotel. Yeah, yeah, that's not a joke. That's so. But but again, there's different things that the air force does and one of the things the Air Force has is an Air Force University, so you can actually get a associates degree while you were in your four years in the air force. Same thing that when I was in they were called MCIs. You had to do these little red books and stuff. Well, again, they have taken those and they've gotten a lot of those classes accredited for college credit. So the things that I have to do in the in the Marine Corps were in the other branches of service can translate to college credits. So when you're done with the military you're able to transfer that over to to a degree or to push...

...hey, ourd got sixty credits of all this good stuff I've done in the military. So I would tell anybody today that wants to join you know, yeah, join the Marine Corps and I will the one thing that the Marine Corps has and we all know. You know I don't. You know, I just met these two marines today. I know rich from a few years ago, but if they asked me to do anything for them, I would immediately help the heart beat, without without question, their marines and I would help them for whatever. I mean, I've, you know, been driving down the road and see Marines like broke down on the side of the road and they got a start, I got a sticker on their car. I will pull over and help that person, whether it's a marine or a Marines family. You know, I want to try and help them. So, you know we have that's a brotherhood. Yeah, and I mean we have a saying, you know, once some marine, always a marine. I know the armies trying to bite us. They say once a soldier, always a soldier now, but we've been saying once some marine, always a marine for countless you yeah, it's ton tavern. Yeah, so mark, Mark I basically Craig disnowned it on the head. I mean the oppertunity. I think it's it's not for every young person, you know. I mean that's kids that are I don't know, they just maybe got the adhd whatever, they have attention problems or they just can't pull it off. They or their mom was Bueezer. Even women, I mean be nice to have these females, you know, pick up. But just like Craig said, he doesn't have to beat a Marine Corps. If maybe suit you better, so be it. But it's I think it's a hell up better than sit in your mother's basement when you're twenty one years old, playing video games and just basically refusing to get a job. But yeah, I definitely would recommend. Like I said, let me throw your curveball real quick. What of those video games is making that kid money? Mark, but you know, but you're not. You're not going to get the characteristics, you're not going to get the loyalty, the integrity, you're not going to be a renaissance man. And so those kids who make money on video games are no. I'm saying why? No? I have an eighteen year old. That's which is his maybe had video games. I was just called Internet money right. You know. So there's a small percentage of people. You know, it's just like people who are in play high school football and say I'm going to go on to the NFL. There's a small percentage of people that can do that. The rest of them are not doing that, you know. So if you're motivated to learn to do that kind of stuff, well then you're an entrepreneur and you have that skill set and you'll be successful in anything you want to do. But you know, recruiting duty assistance, if you guys had that back in the S, but I did the recruiting assistants where I put on dress blues and walk through the malls, you know, Ne Somber time, trying to more people when whatever. And I think we had a bigger calling than to do the mediocre job that I had in high school. And I had a bigger calling. And I want to travel when I'm want to see the world and I want more experience. I'm want more I want more maturity. I want to see the world. I wanted to become more than just somebody that barely left their hometown. When I told my kids stories about. You know, whatever, where I've been, what I've done. You get US amount of self pride from this. You know you you carry your you carry yourself like a marine because you feel good inside because you've changed the world. So I ain't saying it's for every high school or whatever, but if they have the read the calling to do it and they have the abilities and whatever, yeah, definitely recommend it. Okay, rich, I got funny story for them. Now you've met my son before. So when my son was in high school, I asked him Mysel, what are you going to do when you get at a high school? He said, I'm I'm thinking about going into the Marine Corps. So unlike gray where I say it's a great yet my first question was why? Why do you want to go into Marine Corps? He said, well, because you did it. That's that's not a reason to go in. I said what else you think about? Well, maybe the army. So why do you arm? You? Well, because that's what t t his own my brother and pop on and into. So he's talking about all the different branches. So now I finally asked him. I said, so what your what you taught GPA? Your great point of average I think he was carrying a three point nine. Yeah, I said, dude, I said, if you're seriously thinking about the marine were, what about? Have you looked into like either west point or the Naval Academy? Well know, I said, you need to look into the...

Naval Academy. So that's that's the that's the way we went for the Naval Academy. And he is to go into the Naval Academy, you got to get a senator sign and I think you get two letters, letters, two letters of recommendation. So we already had the senator. That was no problem. My sister's a flight attendant for for southwest and she met this guy on the plane. was talking to him, telling her, telling him about my son and at the my son hadn't taken his sats yet. He wasn't worried about it. He had a girlfriend. Marines will tell you girls are the devil. They can change a lot. It's up. Yeah, so this guy told my sister said would tell him to take his sets. I'm allowed to write six letters per year. I think that's what he said, and I will write him a letter and when my sister got home. Now my sister, when it comes to sports. My sisters not the brightest person in the world. So she was told me about this, he said. She said, yes, I'm guy that played with the cowboys or something like that. Okay, ses, he's got some kind of trophy from college. I said Heisman trophy? Yeah, she said yeah, that's it. I said what's the GUY's names gets? I don't know, Robert something or something like that. It's a Roger Stall back. Yeah, that's it. Yeah, so that enable county. Yeah, and he was going to write a letter for all. My son had NEWISTA DSAT's, but he never did because now I got accepted to a college to go in Tennessee, because he's a musician. But he did do that, as you know. Now you join the electricians junior and it's going through the apprenticeship program. That's good. Loves it. I mean ask you first question. Somebody comes up to me and says that that's the first thing I want to do. Is it? Why? Why do you want to join? Because it's not for everybody. And if somebody says it's all bad the video games, well, because I'm great at call of duty, I could do this, dude, video game. At the same as when you got that rifle in your hand. It's completely different, unless you're flying a drone. Nowadays, you can sit here stayside to be flying drones overseas, which is pretty freaking awesome, an opportunity. Yeah, but you still need to feed on you're just using a joystick instead of a yeah, just as traumatic. I could tell you that the Marine Corps was my rebirth. So I mean I was born hate to use the word born again, but the Marine Corps was is my foundation in my life, legitimately the foundation of my life. It's a foundation of everything. Is Who I am. I would do the same thing. Rich said. Why? Why do you want to do it? What's the reason? Because a lot of them have a curse review and they see things like through the video games, like my son is one of those guys who is now got a great job video games, working for a company that makes Video Game Nice. So so I would say why? So they understand it, because once you go in, you can't come out. And I think, are they doing six years now or for they still doing it for you four and if you do like avionics, it might be a six year tour. By the way, he's he must be a very intelligent guy, because Abe I don't actually need to have a really good score to be doing he did all right. So real quick before we start wrapping this thing up, Craig, you want to you want to touch on on our toys for tots and let him know you know how the Marine Corps are. Maybe just go run through from the beginning and all the way to how Harford counties involved. So the toys for tots program is an official program of the United States Marine Corps Reserve. We have the backing of the common on of the Marine Corps. There is a nonprofit arm because one of the things they learned back in the s was it was very difficult to donate money to the Marine Corps. So now we have the marine toys for tots foundation. There are unred, one, c three. So they accept all of the cash donations and are able and any gifts and kind they're able to write, you know, tax tax letters for anybody. So anyway, that popped up in the s and has been going strong. There are currently eight hundred and sixteen programs around the country. Every Single Marine Corps reserve program participates in a program in their local area. Now here in Harford County. We don't have a Marine Corps Reserve Program so the Marine Corps League, which is the Veterans Organization similar to the American Legion or vfw, except raw marines and Navy Corman, we're the ones that run the program so probably back I would say ten years ago, ten eleven years ago they started...

...the toy they broke off from the six motor, excuse me, from Fourth Combon Engineer Battalion, which is the Reserve Unit Down in Baltimore, and Harford County got our own program now everything that's donated here in Harford County stays in Harford County. So that means if you donate toys in one of our boxes around here, it comes to my warehouse and then we distribute those. Last year we helped over six thousand kids. We distributed thirty threezero toys. And now was during covid. So we got very lucky. Last year we had the sears building, you know, which is currently empty, at the mall, so we were able to social distance with covid. It looks like this year we're going to have the old old moths, the dealership next to the Bel Air BMW dealership. Okay, all right there on you know, right next to them all there. That's going to be where we're going to do our distributions. And we not only help organizations, which I think last year we were I think we help fifteen organizations. So care for family has stuff like that. You give. Oh Yeah, yeah, we help. Yeah, Church, a lot of churches and different organizations. You have to be either a church or a nonprofit. File right in order to get toys from us. We've helped in the past, not not last year, but we've given assistance to the sheriff's department. You know. One year they run their own toy program you know. So there was one year that they were short on a specific something or another. Actually, I can't it was like five years ago and we were we had them. So I'm like that, you know, let's just do it. So, I mean people think about toys for tots because it's a national program and it gets a lot of national exposure. You know, it's down on the Baltimore News all the time, the reserve center down there, you know, because they have marines. That actually the coordinator down there as an actual active duty marine. He's part of the eye and I staff. He gets down there, you know, and they've got their dress blues and there you're doing all these big fancy events, whereas here in Hartford County we're we are still trying to get more businesses involved in doing things locally. So, whether it's take a collection box or have a party at and you know you have in your annual holiday party and you tell everybody, yeah, we're going to support toys for tots, bring a toy for it, or you run a business and you say, okay, if you bring a toy, we're going to give you a coupon. Like, for instance, Texas roadhouse helps us out. They give us, you know, if you donate a toy, will give you a coupon for a free appetizer. Miller's Ale House lets us, is a big sponsor here in Harvard County. I'm sure we're going to be working with the new mission barbecue because the mission barbecue down in Perry Hall they supported the Program Toys for tots very well, so we're looking forward to them opening up and coming on board as a supporter as well. So yeah, we're just looking for more businesses here in the county to step forward and help us, and that's whether it's collect toys or make a monetary donation. So if you make a monetary donation or write a check, you just write that check out the toys for tots. Basically we have a PO box here in Bel Air. It's on our website. You can just go to toys for Tots Dot Org, click down to says find your local campaign. You Click on Maryland, you click on Harford. It'll bring our local page up. All of our local information is on there. If you want to make an online donation with a credit card, you can do that. Our address to mail in a check. Basically what would happen is it comes through me, I put a little stamp on it that says Harford County, Maryland, and then I mail that check to the foundation and it gets put in the foundation's account for our use here locally. So I will go out to like matter of fact, I buy a lot of toys from five below toys r us of course when they existed. All he's is a big sponsor of our so down in Aberdeen right red nurse is a big sponsor here in Harford County. So you know there are a lot of places that make financial contributions and then you know where I'm able to go and buy toys from. So you know if you own a toy shop or place where we can get toys, I have the ability to come and buy toys because our program runs all the way from infant all the way up to eighteen years old. So I don't necessarily a lot of programs. So as a coordinator I make that determination. Right around the country people say they stop at thirteen, fourteen, fifteen because it's harder to buy for the older kids. But I can't see someone that has an eight year old child and a seventeen year old child and me not getting something for them. Seven to the seventeen year old child. So we know you can donate year round. You know we keep a storage facility. That's good because I'm sure toys are probably on back order as well. Yes, we're going to be making some purchases...

...very shortly. So I am always looking for different stuff to do for fundraising. So we will probably be having a conversation now that I know what you do for a living. Um, I actually have a marketing director. He's like my fundraising guy. What I've learned to do here. I have two assistant coordinators. I have a warehouse manager and Assistant Warehouse Manager and now a marketing director, and his job us a salesman. So he goes out and visits places and request donations. But we're always looking for places that'll do things. So, you know, maybe it's not me. Ideally, I don't want to have to put the time and effort in. I want to be able to support like so say, millers say they want to do something, so they have an event at their at their building, you know, with whatever, you know, whatever they have, whatever money they raise, and then that comes back to me. I can go there. I can send Marines in uniform to be at that event and show the Marine Corps colors where the business is doing ninety percent of the work and we just have to show up there. So but I'm also looking for other new opportunities. Whatever is available will I'm open to what do you because you depended. What are you? What are you spending every year? This is good for some people here. This what are you spending every year to buy? Because you're not it's not all given to you. You got to know. I probably so. I think last year I think I spent thirty onezero dollars on toys. So we do have some national vendors with toys for tots. So I I do make a purchase through a national vendor because I just can't get enough toys locally at the cost savings that I need. But places like Ali's give me a discount sometimes. What you know, Walmart will give me a discount. Walmart has a grant, you know. So like I put grant applications into through their foundation at the three walmarts here in Hartford County and they're all different, you know. So if the managers are listening at Walmart, you know, hit the button to say approve me, because I you know, they waited last year, all right, you know, and I think I got two thousand from one and I might have got a thousand from another and five hundred from another. But I mean they can give up to three thousand per year. So and they help all the it's their local you know. But their tons of other groups out there that do exactly the same thing. So, Oh yeah, everything's Tizard, no productor three. So if somebody wants to get in touch, the email here is Harford dot MD, at toys for todds Dot Org. We're on facebook and twitter phone numbers. Four hundred and two, six hundred and forty two, four, four two eight. When does the facility open up at the miles the dealership is I is. I'm working on the lease today when I leave here, so that's coming up soon. So if a local business wants to have a toy drive for toys for tots, they can collect the toys and drop them off at that facility or they can get in touch. will deliver your boxes to you. Will pick the boxes up, unless you want to help us out by delivering. I had over a hundred volunteers come through my warehouse and help me last year. I really don't turn any volunteers away. If you want to come by where you new unwrapped, new, unwrapped toys. So how can somebody like with me of Horford canny living, because I K don't have a police where I can put a box. But how can I help that? I mean, do you guys have your even with the podcast? Do you guys have like eds or eat rate, whether it be radio ADS or display edge? They have? Yeah, so they have. I can provide you with the CD is out. All that okay, and there's going to be donation centers all around the county. Yeah, we had a hundred and eighty drop. Wow. So the so, just so you where the bridge is part of the MTA and the MTA collects from all of their sites and takes it to one central location down in Baltimore so they can take a big photo opportunity photo and then all those toys go to Baltimore. So don't come hard. So they don't go to Harford County. It's a little bit of it. You well, yeah, they don't. So so if my money in the Cecil County, the coordinator and Cecil County, it's always kind of a rub for us there. So if anybody wants to get in touch with Craig, the coordinator toys for tots, the Um, like I said, the email is Harford dot md at toys for todds Dot Org and the Lo local website is going to be Harford, MD dot toys for Tots Dot Org. And I'm here...

...with George Wooden, rich, Bennett Marks Zenski, Craig reeling from this civilian thank you for your service. I'm Joe Aler and this is another episode of Lifetime Oath, happy but thirty six. Thank you for thanking if you have any interests of being a guest on lifetime move, just email me at rich Bennett. It's our Seh be and and Ett at Dan bencom. Dan Been Is Delta Alpha, November, Bravo, Echo, novembercom and yeah, we'll be sure to set let me get you on. This is a monthly podcast where you are looking for people that are either active military veterans, first responders, doctors, nurses, family members of spouses. Everybody's got a story and we want to hear about it. So please, please, please, please. I can't ask you enough. Get in touch with me. We'll go ahead and get it scheduled. Doesn't matter whether you're here in the states or in another country. We have the ability set it up to where we can still record. So again, just email me, rich Bennett, at Dan bencom.

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