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Lifetime Oath
Lifetime Oath

Episode · 10 months ago

Too Damn Big For The Tank - Marine and Retired Maryland State Trooper George Wooden

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

George Wooden served in the Marine Corps and joined the Maryland State Police afterwards. George tells us why he didn't get the MOS he wanted in the Marines and his work in the Maryland State Police and how much everything has changed since he retired.

Sponsored by Tar Heel Construction Group who is always looking out for active Military, Veterans, First Responders and the community.

So some people join the military because they want to fight. If there is wary they want to go over there. Some people like to join the military for the education, the experience, to travel. There's so many different reasons. But one thing with the military, even if you join doing wartime, it's not guaranteed that you're going to see action. However, if you join the police force, chances are you will. And the thing is with far military veterans were always thinking them Yo and it doesn't matter whether they served or in combat or not. We're always thanking them. But we need to do that with the police and the firefighters, especially a police we need to thank them every day because, if you think about it, there war every day here in the United States and unfortunately, nowadays they're also worth the politicians, and that's scary. On this episode of Lifetime Moth, you're going to hear from a brother of mine, and when I say brother, he and I both served in the Marine Corps together. So he is my brother, but he's also retired from the Maryland State police and the story that you're going to hear from him being on the police department is it's eye opening. This is George Wooden story he took the lifetime oath. You're when it came to find a sponsor for lifetime oath, I wanted somebody that I knew cared about the veterans in the first responders, somebody that actually did a lot in the community, and I was able to find that exact person, Joe Eyler of t our heel construction group. I am happy to say they are the exclusive sponsor for lifetime ooth. Tar Heel construction group does basically anything exterior wise on your house, whether besiding, windows, roof, gutters. They take care of it all, and the best thing about it is they look out for the veterans in the first responders. They're not one of these companies that say, Oh, free root for your you know if you're a veteran and all that. They that's a marketing employee. People do that because he wanted. They're taking advantage of a lot of the veterans and first responders. In my eyes, Tar heel doesn't do that. Yeah, if they find out you're a veteran, they're going to take care of you. They find out you're a first responder, they're going to take care of you. But guess what, even if you're not, they're still going to take care of you. They are the two thousand and Nineteen Harford Award winner for outstanding service to the community. They are gf master elite Roofer. They have the Harford canty living stamp of approval. They have won the Harvord candy living choice awards as well as the best of Harford. And when it comes to reviews, well, just look down good to our heel construction groupcom. Do a Google search on tar heel construction group reviews. You'll see how great people love them. good to t our heel construction GROUPCOM or give them a call at four hundred and zero three, eight seven zero two one. Again, that's four hundred and two sixty eight seven zero two one. Also, just when the legionary views, information or opinions expressed during lifetime move are sole e there's of the individuals involved and do not necessarily represent those of tar heel construction group or their employees. My name is rich Bennett and this is lifetime mooth. On this podcast you'll hear from veterans, active military, their families, their spouses, firefighters, police officers, nurses, doctors, first responders, all these people that serve us. They served to protect us, they serve to defend the constitution of the United States. These are people that have served on words time. They have served throughout different cities of the United States or at the world. They have served our peacetime. They have some incredible stories, whether sad. Some will make you man, some will make you lay. These are the people that have taken the lifetime like the welcome everybody the lifetime oath. I am your host, Rich Bennett, Marine Corps veteran, and I am sitting here...

...with Joe Eyler. He's my cohost today, sponsor, owner of Tar Hill Construction group, and sitting here with my brother, well, brother in arms, Marine Corps veteran, Maryland state troop, retire Maryland State Trooper, George Wooden. And those of you listening, you know lifetime ooth is all about. We and listen to the military. We become a firefighter, first responder, police officer. We take that oath and that look, that oath to protect and to serve is with us for a lifetime. And also, first of all, Joe, thanks for coming in, and George, welcome, and it's years. George and I have known each other for for a long time and I want to start from the beginning. First of all, before the Marine Corps. All right, when you were, oh, you were a kid, was it your dream to become, you know, go into the military? Yes, it was. Yes, you want to know why? Yeah, of course. Well, my father, my father, I grew up in a very discipline oriented household, my father who worked at Bethlem Steel for forty three years, who's passed away now, but he was in the Marine Corps. I had two cousins who were in the Marine Corps and I looked up to them. They were my mentors. They were in the Marine Corps. Had A cousin killed in Vietnam. Them was a marine. So I heard the stories constantly because, you know, jar hads. We talked about yeah, by the way, JAR head is an endearing term. Then only another marine can call each other. So the all the stories, you know the stories. I just I just wanted to hear the stories and I wanted to hear the stories from my cousins and I wanted to hear the stories from my father. And my father had an old Ky bar, that old big US and life. I still have it. So I heard the stories and I heard the stories and I heard the stories and and and it just became ingrained in me, you know. HMM. So I'm living in life of discipline because my father was very disciplinarian and I went to private school which was very discipline, or Archbishop, curly and skids, and it was it was it natural for me to do it, so I wanted to do it. They did you in rite after high school, right out of high school, one thousand nine hundred and eighty four, I keme, I graduated and then went right in the boot camp. Write the PARASIL SOUTH CAL on. She Miss Parasol. I like you better listen to describe, to describe the hell whole of Parasolm it is legitimately, it's it's a nightmare with a good ending. Yeah, what's the recruitment process look like? Oh, the ute, okay, okay, okay, well, no, let me, let me okay, here's the funny part about it. Okay, here's this is the craziest. This is so funny. Going to love them. There's a lot of different these days. You got to go to a you've got to go to a recruitment center, you've got to get screened, you've got it same thing, the same thing, man. So, but the funny part about it is is this, is that you guys both know me. We've obviously known each other for years. Right. So I wanted to be a tanker. Tank drive a tank right, be right, anker. Well, could you even fit into one to drive it? Exactly? I'm six foot five. Okay. So the recruiter will tell you just about any damn thing. You want to know anything, you want to hear. Their salesman get you to sign a contract. Once they sign a contract they move on. Right. So they said sure, you could be a tanker. So I'm six five, all right, and young, fin fin. then. So I go through parasylum, which is a whole other way to go. Go through Parasolm. I go to Campbell Joon, North Carolina, and for anybody that's down they had a called lejern. It's actually Le June, but in North Carolina. And I check in the second tank battalion, and I can still remember this. I'm walking down the hallway and I'm standing I'm private, I'm not even a PFC yet. Right, first class. I'm standing there at attention with my orders because I'm checking in. It's a long halting. Just picture. This is long hallway and the first harden's office is no Sergean Major's office is alway at the end of the hallway and I'm standing in front of him and I'm I laid my packet down, my orders down, and he's going, I get really watched what I say, because this isn't one of those clean podcast this is nice. Is A unfiltered. This is unfiltered, unfilter you sure? Yes, all right. So he's like, he looks at my orders. He goes, this is some fucking joke. This is a Guy Damn joke. Here. Dona re sergeant, gunny, Sergeant Right, some six, five, gone, gone, gone. resurgeant...

...comes running down these sir. He says, look at this bullshit, and he lays down my orders and it scunner, sergeant, Ring Corps and the gun. He's like a that's a like really cool rank. He's looking at the more orders. He's looking at me. So kind of orders. It's going to me is good. We got to get this shit straight down right here, right now. He's like how tall are you? Boy? I said six five, sir. He's like, Jesus Christ, we got to get this shit straight now. So for two weeks I hung around a second tank battalion. How tall are you, Joe? That's the maximum height for a tank. I would have a three, say. They later told me I'd have a three second life expectancy in the tank. And I get everybody else can that. They if they drive, can't drive it. I tried it. You can't drive it. It's do to way too big. So they gave me a choice. What they did was they gave me a choice. They said I could either be a I could either go to cobalt computer school, Cobalt, what's cobalt gone? Or either go balk compute computer, cobalt computer school, or because I had the grade side the score for it, or go be a grunt. Three eleven or three eleven right. What was my choice? And I thought for about us what second and said Cobalt Computer School. I'm not I don't want to bear a grunt. I don't want to bear a grunt, I want to carry it. Good God, love you. Okay. So by the time I went into school to learn a computers, because I'm setting myself up for later right now. This is an eighty four hundred and eighty four. Yeah, I go into school. As I come out of school, cobalts gone. They've already got rid of it. You know how quick technology is changed. So they figure out, what am I going to do with you? They said, we're going to send you to headquarters Marine Corps. You're going to be a bodyguard. So I went the headquarters Marine Corps. I worked at Headquarters Marine Corps, which is in Washington, the DC in Arlington, Virginia, actually right above the Pentagon. No, it's DCR. QUANTIC goes. You alls want goos off, sir offer. It's like Quantico. Is the is the parasol and equivalent to four officers. They go to Blanca. So so headquarters Marine Corps sits at the top of South Carolina. Yes, Carolina, hell whole. We could talk to actual island. No, they call it an island. It's a more of a peninsula than it says. But it's on the in your Charleston. Yes, across the swamp. We could do it. Is a swamp. It's a swamp. We'll talk about that a minute. So so, because the boy, that's a story. So so I go to go to Headquorse Marine Corps and I'm running the Pentagon. Is Right down the right down the hill. It's the Henderson Hall, which is the Base Associated Headquarters Marine Corps, which is actually the apartment of the navy. He was the navy heads Marine Corps, same building and I was there during Ali north. I worked prowly north. Sweet. Yeah, when he got taken out a NSA, he got sent to head Coors Marine Corps. I'll he was a really great guy. Just recently saw them. He's a really great guy still. He said yes, s late. He's always seven these. He was really good guy, really great. First kind of famous kind. He was the fall guy for Ronald Reagan. Yeah, for the whole guns. He's like the first real kind of military figure that I remember standing in front. I have the heat signed the Time magazine. Who I'm standing in front of? His hand raised in the air. He signed it to me. When he's corporal, George would and thank you for everything. So he was a fall guy for the presidents. What he was? He was the was it sacrificial lamb? Yeah, like the Cold War stuff now happen. Was this? They were? They were selling guns to the contrast. That Reyan contrare thing. They were selling guns the contrast and drugs constras. They were head outfletting them and they had to blame it on somebody and they blamed it all way down the hill to one alley and I like took the fall, but they took care of them quietly. So I worked there and I still bodyguard for the common ont and the assistant common ont and a couple generals and run top secret or secret stuff back and forth to the Penangon all the time. So I did for three years, HMM, and a course of REE Corp. Then I got orders and I went to Okn Awa for a year and got did okay Al went to Korea and then I could on Japan Korea for Team Spirit, doing a team spirit. Team Spirit was like a like we you not. We're talking about this one the phone yesterday. It's a fake war. Yeah, say, yes, they put on take word of to intimidate the North Koreans. What do do Marines do? Peacekeeping operation. That's...

...what they rout. Lebanon was. Yeah, I can eighty three different it's not just the arm of that does, or the or the reserves, or what do you mean? Peacekeeping as hill like? Is it always liked? Are the Marines always deployed like in a look at a wartime kind of always the first ones always verace and last one's out. And we could him and I could really tell you something, some real could go and real deep about Tarawa and some of the old because we all know the history. So so I went to Okinawa, almost station O Canal, which is beautiful. I love that. He loved it. And then I went to Korea, which was an absolute opposite of OAKAN Ala. Six months in a sixteen man tent that was with one little tiny heater. Was Free Korean winner. And then was getting ready to get out when sent went Camp Penalton, California, and got out of their discharge, honorably discharge out of there, and then they're raining. Yeah, and I left out of there and came home. But parasil and for all intense purposes, Parasil and the draw instructors are the most educated psychologists you could ever know in your life. They literally changed my life. My Drum structors did the eyes MMM, and it is and they know what they're doing. They keep you awake for thirty six hours, so you're in delirium and they can mess with your mind and everything else. They they could tell you. Get them on the top of that building and jump and you would go SAR, you go up to the building and jump. They've had had my entireble. Tune in a dipsie dumpster, in a dumpster. It told us we were all trash getting the dumpster. Talk about thirty guys and a dumpster. He's drone shockers. They just they tune you up. You're just a war machine. You'll do it in you're told. Jeverse, full metal jacket, Joe, very early army. Probably that. There's two movies I've seen where that shows what Parris Islm is like. That and the Di with Jack Wet. That's how the drill instructors truly are, and that's it dries some people crazy. And in the did you see the movie Jar had? Yeah, but yeah, that's some moments like where he was really getting his ass kick. Yeah, it's full metal jacket. That's that's that's his real yeah's full metal jacket when he's screaming, you know he's screaming out. That's very real. Yeah, very, very, very, very very it's mine games. They got to get. Yeah, the Brotherhood and like airs on. No, I mean just just the mantra of the Marine Corps. Yeah, the Marine Corps. I. It's a it is a team, it's a family, it's you always brought you all had your brother's back in. You know what, why are they screaming on people? Way? Because, just howe they want to test your stress. Yeah, it's just want to test your stress, how mentally tough you are. And they want to mentally tough because, listen to me, mentally tough goes way back and even went transcended into my next career. Right, mentally tough when you're in the worst part of the worst part of war or whatever. If you're not mentally tough, you're dead. MMM, everybody with you is dead and they need to know that you'll follow orders under duress, extrang doers and training and then, Oh God, Yah, yeah, a couple years later and it'll be they're just let me to the which Nice. The thing is, all right. So when you go through boot camp, your I mean you're called scum, green or you're called everything in the book until that last day at graduation and they take that Eagle Globe and anchor and place it in your hand and they even tell you don't call me Sir, you only call off sir, sir, except or boot camp. Yeah, your drill instructors, anybody ranked above you, you call them sir. If you say well, thank you, sirt. No, you're a marine now, Serge Gun Yeah, you call me gunny, you call me stay, sergeant, sergeant whatever. It probably the proudest moment my parents, and I told you before, my father was upset when I came home the papers and joining Marine Corps. Here I was seventeen. He refused to sign because he was navy. That's what he wanted me to go through. And when I turned eighteen I was in Paris island, but I quit high school my in May. My senior year was in Paris island in June. My parents were upset because I quit high school. Now, back then you didn't need a diploma. I went in eighty one. They actually made it mandatory while I was already in. So I started to get it. But my mother, when she my mother and father, actually, I think my sister and my brothers too, when they came down for graduation, my mother said my sister had graduated from high school. She was the first one to graduate from high school. So she graduate...

...before I did. My mother said and my father most impressive graduation ceremony they have ever seen. It is, they say. They they find the bottom of the bottom of the bottom of you, MMM, and they're constantly reaching deeper in you. I'll listen. I'll tell you straight. Before I went in to Marine Corps I was the biggest weapon there was. I was bullied horrible in high school. How it's a majority of my majority of them. I had guys like running across the prey deck naked, the prey field. That's called the prey deck, like running across it's a big that just one knots. They just give up because it's intense. Yes, intensity. It's not even like to usually hear like the intensity with like the seal training and stuff like that, not just regular Oh man's. It's a it's basic. I what it? That's basic training, but it is, it is, it is. It is solid intensity from the moment you get there for eight weeks. It is non stop, full out mental and physical dress. You're always attacked, MMM, and you're always scared to death. Always, and a big difference between basic training when we were into now. My understanding is now, if you can hack it, you can actually quit back then. Back then we suld not. We had a guy because when we when I went in, the barracks were three levels. Yeah, okay, so you start off at the top level. We had a guy. Unfortunately, his last name was the same as mine. We weren't related, thank God. I think. After a week or two he couldn't hack it. So he you get a bag, you turn in your civilian clothes. Where you get there? First of all, kid your hair shit, your head shaved in everything, and they give you your Duffel bag with everything in it. One of those things was a bottle of whisk to do your laundry. He drink that bottle of whisk thinking that he gets sick and get out. Hey, went to sick bay. Yeah, there, come right back again and start over again. So then what he did? Jumped out the third floor window to try to get out. Broke his arm. That's all that had. He did every thing he could try to get out and they said now and then finally, you now. Back then they I forget what the law was called, but you you, basically you couldn't be gay and in the military. HMM. So he signed paper stating that he was and that's how he got it. This is way before don't as don't tell yes, way before that. What they do like to make sure you don't have a heart murmur. And well, yes, no, they they did check for that because, matter of fact, when I was in in boot camp, the first run we do is what three miles? Hmmm, first run we had a kid eighteen years old, fellow over, died of a heart attack. But I mean they you, he took the physical beforehand and everything was fine. When I'm stress level, what I'm saying the stress level is like you're you're like like the needle that's tapping at all the time. It never gives up, it doesn't ever slack down. It your you're at Max. Every minute, every second, you're at Max. And they do that on purpose and they they push that maximum for different people, like they really pushed it for me because I was a straight up whimp going into Paris, AL scared. That's a which is something I'd want to get into. But and they pushed it on me and made me unleash because at that young of an age you're still developing very child your personality, and so some of those things that they put it through are going to mold the the kind of human being you are for the rest of your life. Yeah, it legitimately the Marine Corp. For me, the Marine Corp built the foundation in me, like they it's like, like what you do for living built the foundation in me that transcended my entire life and has me today, like I'm not, I am not the man I I'm the man I am today at fifty five years old because of cozy weeks in eight weeks in the Marine Corps, eight weeks in parasilams. It's it, just everything, everything, eight weeks. Was it? When? Thirteen? Thirteen weeks? Yeah, so, longest, longest basic train, it just everything. They know exactly what to do is it's seven days, seven days a week, only seven days a week, sixteen hours a day, and hurt you. You can. They have church services on something. Fact. I use that. Yeah, so my benefit, I would take a break to go to church. Something physical happening every single Oh God, you every day, physical or mentally, even when you're sleeping.

Yeah, I mean it's the wake up and everything, and God, Christmas, that stuff. Christmas, Christmas, we went and they made us. They are our gift. Our Christmas gift was go watch the sands evil Gima with John Wayne. I remember that. Yeah, you know, so it was. It's it's made for a reason. It's meant. The Old Marine Corps was meant for a reason. It would james weather, they're lifting the flag. Yes, seems you with Geema. So that's a whole nother cool story. All of them are marines there, right, some navy guys in there and the photo was staged. That, you see. So the from a from a civilian perspective, you know, it's like we're not, you know, we don't know. Yeah, and when I was in high school, you know, you take us history, but then after that it's like you you rely on your life's experiences to educate yourself on on Glube, you know, on American, what is right, what they teach you, what they taught all set in the Marine Corps with they taught me, and obviously rich too. was like we every night, my one, we went to bed. We they grind, grind it into your subconscious that you are a word dog, devil dog right. Every night we used to say this before we go to bed. It was a chance. We had to say it three times. I remember this. I remember I was eighteen then. I'm fifty five now. Devil dogs, sharp troops, blood sucking war machines, ready to fight, ready to kill, ready to die, but never will. Over and over and over again, devil dogs, sharp troops, blood sucking war machines, ready to fight, ready to kill, ready to die, but never will. I could still remember. It gives me chills. You think it's? I mean, do you think it's? Is it brainwashing? Yes, yeah, but is it? Is it good? Yeah, yes, yes, Oh, my father would swear to you that I was brainwash. Yes, I came home for for for life. I think so. It's discipline, desipate. I would never been to stay trooper if it would to be. No Way. There's a lot of people come out of the Marine Corps going to the police for no way. No, there's no way. There's I would have never listen. I mean I was scared to that. I was scared to death to get into a fight. Yeah, HMM, scared to death. I came out of Parasilon and guys were saying you got you have to have a hit list. There's guys as you're going after, and I did. What do you think? Going through a kick? Can you still would be? Can you still come out of that environment loving and Caring and compassionate, and I think it is. Yeah, it's still kind of kind of have the best. Now what a team. I think you do want above fear. I think you have that more. Yeah, it teaches, yeah, it teaches you to it pushes you to the end of your physical limitations, your emotional imitations, your spiritual limitations. You know you can do just about anything. Plus, you love the country more, you love the people around you more, you care and respect for everything more, and especially for that red, white and blue. Yeah, and there's nothing more that I seek after my personal life than mental fortitude and mental toughness. Is Mental is something that a lot of people chase. Mental fortitude is absolutely, absolutely, one million percent, all about the Marine Corps, our song, your mouth, because everything comes down to mental fortitude in the end, even your physical limitations, like what I'm saying. Physical Imitations, I'm talking about like marching for twenty seven miles in a circle, which seems like you're walking around Parasilon and one big loop, but they're literally like looping around with a pack with a hundred pounds on it. Twenty, twenty seven miles. That's mental fortitude. That it is physical fortitude. It gets you through mentally, so you can push yourself wide anything. Anything, everything, anything. I wouldn't be who I am today, well after my retirement, if it wouldn't have been for those weeks in pair song. It's truth. Listen, even though one bald, I still shave my head, still shave my head. To Marine Corps I was. I went from the from the Marine Corps in the the Maryland State police because it was the next step. It was the Marine Corps in Maryland. Yeah, what is that? Does that have something to do with getting pushed to those limits? Is that? Is that a contributing factor to the pts, do you think? Or is that wartime to my PTSD? Well, me, just just in general. Well, no, not. Not. Not pair storms. I think air sound doesn't give you pts. If you go to war, if you go to war and you're faced with absolute death and you're faced with extreme fear,...

...yea then, but not keeping missions, like if peace keeping, peacekeeping missions, like when I was in Koreasing in the military, isn't going to give you PT No. Well, from a just remember the list. I mean, I'm not just not, not, not. It all depend military. Yeah, but it all depends on to the mission to you have to have a mission. You've yet put into a position where, yeah, there's traumatic PTSD, post traumatic stress. So it has to be something that's traumatic. That is when we get into talking about being a police officer. Then I'll explain to you, like the reality policing traumatic. It's got, it has so much trauma. My trauma was, what am I going to eat today? You know, like I made a post on facebook. You saw it and we may a song. Like like I had a job for four years. It was a job and I once there some great places around the world and then saw some great, really cool things and experienced a lot of great stuff. But simply being there doesn't not know, it's not traumatic. Yeah, Ye, parasol and it's just a job. But you take somebody something like that, you know, if you're a marine in your station, depending on when eleven had oh yeah, then, yeah, I mean you had from but every time they have pts day. Yeah, that's truck. They don't want to listen to a trauma. Yeah, yeah, you'll see some of these disturbing videos on online. HMM. Ye, know, whether you know it'll it comes across your feed. You know, it's not. The Internet's on censored, right, you know, and sometimes, you know what, I'll accidentally come across a video of a police getting shot. Please we get shot. Well, that now if we're going to get when we talk about police now, we'll talk with down, we'll talk about severe pts. Day I can really talk about videos. It's traumatic. It's traumatic for me and and what those are called triggers, toss right, I mean. I mean it's traumatic. It's really shitty to watch a video like that, much less. You know, those are the that's trigger. And you know, imagine they got and Matt, imagine the Guy, the guy or the girl. For me, let me be honest with you, I don't listen. We both know the same people. Christy Brasilin from WJAYZ, like I don't watch the news. I don't. Why Not Watch anything? Any of the videos you see on facebook police shootings like in fact, I stay as far personally, they should not be a label fit. It's triggered. It's their triggers for me and they're triggers for my brothers and sisters in blow across the country. And my brothers and sisters have been read to firefighters and paramedics, all those you know, there are triggers. I can't watch it. I can't watch it. I don't want to hear about it. Like you, everybody's talking about some shooting. I don't care. Yeah, I don't want to hear about it. MM, because I can't. It'll just ruin my entire room me for a week. Let's go ahead and go in today. So you did four years in the Marine Corps and then when you got out you went right to police academy. Two and a half years. I took me five times to apply. Oh, to apply, okay, to get accepted and I got a call on a Friday. Oddly, D off for state police in Pikesville when the academy was still there, right the Maryland State police, and I got a call on a Friday. I was working a job and they said Hey, do you still want to be a trooper? I said Yeah, yes, they said be here Sunday. You're an alternate. Somebody dropped out. You're an alternate. You can get in. Wow, I'm gonna apply to either your local police department. I want it to be or it's not like you have to participate at a local level to no, no, you can the marine the equivalent to the Marine Corps in Maryland, but was then the Maryland State police, the stets and the whole thing, you know, the stets in the troopers where like. That's the whole dread. Uniformity in every uniform, everything in militaride, militaristic. I love that militaristic stuff. I'd love it, love it. I love this isn't like one and all that. I live in life on the line. I love that, crave it. Two and a half years got a call on a Friday, was their Sunday, and went in the academy for six months. So the academy was a live in academy right at Pikesville, because now it's in Sikesville, is it? Yeah, moved. I didn't know it. So in Pikesville for you went home on the weekends if you're good, right, but you lived there for six months and I'll be honest with you, it. That then brought up some real hardships for me because I was like, Oh my God, this is parasil and all over again. It was yeah, they they knew. They're screaming and yelling and you getting there and you know tearing up your beds and all that stuff. It was the Marine Corps all over again. So, yeah, so then I saw I got out of the Marine Corps and in two and a half you look, got out of the Marine Corps. I'm going to save something to mout. Two weeks after I got out of the Rink Corps I met Moref on a...

...blind date and we've been now married twenty five, two thousand and twenty five, twenty six years. Wow, so bind it. So there's that twenty a half years between the Marine Corps and the state police. If you don't mind me answer, what were you doing then? Anything I could. I was a bartender, Aton's minds, Martin's catering. I worked, I worked at I worked at a place to win computer stuff. That actually was I didn't know it when I got hired, but they were the was the older, the most of the block, when the block block still the block. Thanks. So I don't know right. So know that anything's open down there, but blown off the face of yeah, yeah, so, so I just did a little bit of everything until I could get hired, and when I got hired I want right in the academy. Okay, I just that's what I wanted to be. I wanted to be a trooper and because of one of my guys I grew up with was a trooper and that's what I wanted to be. I wanted to be a trooper. I wanted to shave my head and I wanted to I wanted to wear a stats and I wanted to do all the cool stuff. Be A cop. I want to be a police officer, but I wanted to be a trooper. And the good thing is, at your height you could sit in the car. Yeah, drive. Yeah, I can said the car and drive it. And in the old days, like they had a height requirement. You had to be. Yeah, six foot three, you had to be, but not now. Not Now. It's that's been going. I was going while I was there. So so I went to the academy, six months out of academy and then Keeme at academy and went to security barrack, which was off security bull one, and then the governor, Shaffer, MMM, decided to close down a bunch of barracks and security barrack was one of them, and pull the pin numbers. So I almost got fired right out of the academy. She because they were getting rid of troopers. Did you know that? And they were. Didn't remember. Want to save your trooper. There troopers every just firing troopers just because they were troopers, because it was government. So want security, Bark. Instead of them getting rid of my position and stay police because government cutbacks, they transferred me to Annapolis Barrack and that's when, excuse me, that's when the bad stars started happening to me right and because I was all always, always wanted to be more. I wanted to be the best of the best. I've driven, you know, a plus old crack almost. You know, that's a Marine Corp Mental. Yeah, and I wanted to, you know, I'm going to press my father and do all this other stuff. But so I started really getting into drug work, like I really want to rest people for drugs. I just went I was going crazier over it. And then I got transferred to Glen Barney Barrack, Glen Bernie Bark in Theron County, and was the te Maril trip of the year, police officer year law and for Merril trip of the year of the entire state, one of the top young Americans in the United States. Police officer year law enforcement officer year I got medals and pins and got news all this other stuff. All that in a dollar and a cord. Today I get you, sweet team McDonald's bather. So, yeah, plaques and interviewed, you know. But because I was really into doing drug interdiction one the road, I was recruited to go under on a Federal Test Force, a Da Task Force, and get federally deputized as a dagent called hide to high intensity drug trafficking area and we did interdiction in airports, planes, buses, trains, anywhere you can think about it. Youps. I didn't work QPS. But so we did major drug in addiction. Major now in the mid S. Yes, this is yeah, Major. I mean, Laura urge, large seizures, thousands and thousands and thousands of pounds of marijuana and hundreds of millions of dollars and drug money and cocaine and heroin and more. Bad stuff happened there and it just compiled and then I got transferred out of there because I was under there for four and a half years. By the way, if I'm running one, tell me, Hey, shut up and I'll keep you're good. So so then I got transferred out of there. You're good. I got transferred out of there and I went to Cecil County Task Force, which is where I lived. Not good being undercover in the same county you live in. No, no, because we, my wife and I, we would be walking through the grocery store and I would run into somebody that I was buying drugs from in the grocery store and my wife knew it if I all of a sudden walked off, if I walked off, she knew not to pursue me right and then she would pick me up down the road somewhere like I would walk and Walk Start Walking home. It happened more than many occasions and some bit based on that. Something really bad almost happened to be. My Wife, my son and I were almost murdered because of that. It was a huge oxycotton investigation, oxycotton diversion thing that these...

...are diffraud and all these doctors out of Cecil County up down East Coast selling at all to Kentucky, pills to Kentucky, and we wind up put an entire family away in in the federal pen. HMM, and entire family, husband, wife, I told you who they were. Out of want to Sam one on this, but I told you who they were and then I got transferred. They were having problems making hand to hand or drug bys in Kent County and Chestertown and I had been up here for a long time. Did a bunch of arrest in Cecil County, worked with the Harford County Test Force, and then he asked me if I would go because I was really good on the cover, which basically means you're really good actor, good life, right. So I don't know if that's good or bad. But and then you got to understand again. Let's go back to this. I'm here, I am six foot five. I look like a state trooper, right. So I had to like gain as much weight as possible, put on pounds and pounds and pounds to make myself not look like a trooper. So they had been having problems doing hand to hand buys and Chestertown for fifteen years. In fact, anybody that they thought was a cop or was not around there, because if you're not from the shore, you're not from the shore. HMM. If they didn't play football with you, go to high school with you or know you, they'll do from yeah, they'll, they'll trust you and they will either kill you or beat you to a pault. So they transferred me down there and then I did some stuff for three months just so that they would think that they knew me. They got used to me, and then I started making hand hands. I was the only one doing hand hands. I Made Ninety five hand to hands and in one little tiny chestertown. Do you know chestertown? It's a little ady Biddie area. Right in the center of town is a really bad spot where they sell crack. It's like lawlessness. I mean ninety five hand hands from fifty five different people and basically wipe that's that. Wipe chestertown out. Wow. But this is where it gets good. And I was standing next to a guy who got was shot in the head right while I was standing next to him. Oh my God, yeah, standing next to him. A Guy came through and shot him in the head right while I was standing there. And then during this time, to like very but one of my mentors in the Maryland State police, Eddie totally, was murdered. He was assassinated and I can still I can see it my what was the name? Eddie totally? Edward totally, was that on ninety five. No, that was Ted Wolf. That's right. Okay, Eddie was a NARC WITH ONE DA task force that was doing a buy, doing a buy down near DC, and a guy by the name of Qukufie, or Leans Lindsay, was robbing him. Was Setting Setting Eddie up. And Eddie, you gotta understand, Eddie Telly, was like one of the best guys you ever know in your life, right, and he is says, look, this isn't one of those things after somebody passes, like you really make a big deal out of them. I mean that's Eddie totally. was a fantastic everybody loved them on the job. After he's passed, even worse, even more so after he passed. Right. So this guy coopter lean's Lindsay, was going to it's called ripping him. He was going to rip him, hit. The plan was he was going to take Eddie's money, just rob him, not give him the drugs. He came he walked out, came back and it was all on tape. None of us have seen it. And you hear Eddie say what's up, Koup, what's up? What's up? What's up? Bang, he reaches in the car and shoots him in the button right in ahead and kills, kills shaddy. They said there could have been a swat team in the back seat of the car and he would have been he would they wouldn't have been him with save him. So all this is compiling. So I'm at to see some canny test force. I'm at the can't county test for saw this stuff. They I do all these hand hands. Now nothing about this. Here this six foot five, predominantly looking like a state trooper. MMM Right. They make me go and it's all on tape. So, like we have glasses and want I had one of the you know there's old things, seven eleven cups with the straw that you can bed. Yeah, it had a camera in it and like timer, like I with the shift that I would work, glasses, the stuff you see him TV glasses with a camera in it and a body wire and you know, they would test you and all this other stuff, though, they made me go into jail. It's could call being burnt. They made me go into the jail down there and it's an open population jail, so everybody sees you. And show these bad guys, these fifty five bad guys that I made these buys from show them the video of me making buys from them in front of the entire population of the jail. Wow, some I'm fried, I'm burnt. It's called being burnt. I'll net. I'll never be able to do anything here. I'm done. So I was getting promoted and they said what do you want to...

...go on? I said Jeff K highway. Go to the highway, which is up in Cecil County. I got promoted to corporal and then got promoted a sergeant and then transferred to Gold Ring Barrick and retired out of Gold Ring Barrick. Twenty years, four years in the Marine Corps, twenty years and state police go back to the burnt thing. Why do they do that? Because to me that's putting your life a risk. Okay, you want a political answer or you want to me answer. Either were. It's the biggest bunch of bullshit you'd ever nobody would ever do that. That's okay, that's all saw. Nobody would ever do that and never do that. Never do that. But they did it. They got away with it. As funny as because the person who thought of the whole thing up was another trooper first class that I worked with him and I thought of this whole operation. And after all, we did it and it was just him and I just met him and I's it right. Like I would go out. It's crazy. I would drive alway from Chestertown, come home at eleven o'clock at night, lay on the couch. At Zero in the morning, I get a call, Hey, I'm up, which means I've got drugs. Get back up, drive all way to touch your town by myself. Nobody knew backup, know nothing. Go do a by shot, go dock it in, put it in evidence and drive all the way back home. No, no, backup, knew nothing. Right, him and I thought of the whole thing. But after the whole thing said and done, who stands out in front of the press, because it's a big thing in the press? All these chiefs, all these big wigs, right, that was all their idea. We named it. There was an inside joke and what we named it. I forget what'll we named it, but it was an inside joke. What we named it was just something like the test force thing, you know, and it was there all idea. They had nothing to do with it. So I got transferred to highway, stayed there and to be honest with you. Once you want you come out of the academy like a robot license or registration tripper woulden Manal s they police. Let me you know that robotic state good, right. And but once when you go on to cover, you got to get rid of that or you're going to get dead. MMM, like cops stand there with arms crossed. You know real, you can't do it. Can't it. Can't even smell it. They're like dogs. They'll smell you know, they'll smell it on you. So you got to get rid of it all. Everything you got by programmed were. You have to reprogram yourself. You've got to get rid of it all. So there's nothing for are you showing the police arm and there's nothing for you to go through to help you reprogram yourself. Know what? Three program yourself back to back to being a robotic yeah, that's the academy. Wow, so nark's never do well back in uniform. Yeah, because you just can't. You can't get it back. Well, there's not training like when you get out of the academy. It's not like yeah, I want to I want to go under cover, I want to know. Well, they send you to school classes and stuff like that, but it's not true. Okay, do this, do that, act like this, act like that. Now it's like you got it or you don't. You got it or don't. And you know, some guys make it, some guys don't. Some guys do really well with it. I'll some guys don't. You know, it's just like some people are a good administrator, some people are great cops. I was a great cop. I was not. One of the worst thing that ever happened to me was getting promoted. I hated being a sergeant, hated it, hated it. I like being a cop. I showed a state a trooper, trooper TFC, trooper first class, because I'm like locking people up. I can remember my wife and I one time. I've told her, if I don't ever hear the sound of handcuffs, click it again, I'm going to go out of my mind because I don't want to sit a desk, please, JFK stars. Wouldn't. I hate it. It was just killed me, you know, sitting the desk, answering a phone, doing reports, just killed me. I like locking people up. I like doing drunken addiction. Loved it, and then they stopped me, legitimately stopped me, said you can't be doing that. You're a supervisor, you can't doing it, and it was like you're killing me. So once you take that out of me, that, you know, rat on crack type A personality and I can't use it with going to my rot. So the under cover stuff, what about it? Would you do that again? Oh, I love that, or would you rather just be in uniform locking people up? One I would love the undercover stuff. Loved it, loved it, loved it, lived it breath that and I also love doing drug interdiction. Loved it, but none of the administrative stuff. But there's always going to be that cat and mask game. All that work, all that good work you did in Chester town. Right now there's somebody doing a they fell it right back in again and isn't no now it's you know, it's get them, get to get it's all sick. is to be there. It always be...

...there. It always be the buttet's eradicate Dru no, no, no, no, no, no, no, you'll never ever if there's so much that as to change. So that'll never change, especially in this air, the Today Day in time. So so getting promoted, which I thought was the key. HMM, getting promoted was not the key. Terrible, terrible ideal on me. Why was that? Because I was rotting and it just made me miserable. It made me miserable in my own skin and then that then erupted, allowed my post traumatic stress stuff and all my anxiety to surface, which then became very hard to cope with. Right. It's very, very, very difficult to cope with. Want a one an hour by hour, minute by minute basis. So are you so with that? With the PTSD, where were you able to go anywhere to because we you got out? How long ago? Ninety? Well, no, noir, thirteen, fourteen years ago I retired. So PTSD was still kind of new. I said, back in the day, was she shock? Well, it was shall shock. Yeah, you know what they would tell you then. Like I let me tell you a story. I remember one Sunday, Sunday during the day, during the morning, it was a Sunday. It was going in for a day shift and I remember driving up six hundred and ninety five going to where this is animal a canning Lem Bernie, and I remember it's like there's nobody on the road. Sunday morning, thirty in the morning, nobody's on the road. Sonny, it's nice and I can see. I could still, I could. I wish I could plug this in my head because this is this is one of my nightmares every visit, all the time. Up ahead of me I could see black smoke, a lot of black smoke, right out of nowhere. So I follow it and there is a car fully engulfed, well, actually getting more and more engulfed, on the shoulder, upside down. Oh driver's side is facing me and I could see it. I wish I could. You could see well, a note. Don't know. I don't wish you could see this and I could see somebody. I get out and I'm like, Glim Barney, there's a car that's full against out. I'm on the radio full and golf start, fireboard did. Another trooper pulls up with me, Kevin Ringold, and him and I are standing there and you can't get anywhere near the car because then there's somebody in there. I got it. Gasoline is like sparting, like bubbling out of the and as coming out of the gas tank, because the stuff you see on TV the back gas stations. His cards blowing up. That done happened. That's the tires pop, right, but the because it got punctured, gasoline's coming out and then it's his golfing. So it's legitimately like the field of fire, intense fire. There's a young guy upside down in the in the driver side of the car, which I know the story of the cart. He fell asleep whenever hit it flipped up in the air, hit the roof, hit a tree and a king, straight back down and it fell right. He is trying to get himself out of the car and he is burning alive, screaming. Man, this is some one of my burning alive, screaming, and I could see him baking, I could smell him. He screaming. I can't get to him. Yeah, we got our fire stinguisher's nothing's working. I can't get tell him. I mean, I'm telling you, it's like hell fire. You keep the heat is so intense and you could he's burning. You could see him like stuff you see on TV. Right, Kevin, we're just standing there like what do we do? And we're watching this get kid die. He turned out to be was like twenty two years old. She's and there's more to the story. Is finally father would go out there. We'd find his father out there, walking up and down in the woods. How in his name's hiding? But he was dead. Things like that. There's far worse. There's you know, I always tell people, like I know what gun will taste like. I think, what, he does that mean? One means I had a gun stuck in my mouth, you know, so the your mouth, your ear, you nose, everywhere else, you know, getting close, fighting for your life. And that's one of the reasons why that as a marine, because I feel like I have the I have the right to say this right and it comes off my facebook prompt like why does everybody praise the praise the veterans, when in reality, I had a job for four years. I didn't see action. Nobody ever shot a bullet at me. Not A job. I got it. I was joking with him. I said I might...

...have got some really major paper cuts, but but for twenty years I every day. I want to war. Putting your life at rush every day. My friends, guys I work work with every day and it is, it is had such an impact in my life and now I work with in my profession. I'm now proudly the COO, the one of the largest law enforcement charities in the country called the wounded blue and I work with a lot of other great charities and New York Law Enforcement Assistance Program all these great charities, the Valor Station and all deal with post traumatic stress and police officers in the suicide rate and law enforcement today is through the roof. Yeah, that nobody even knows about it. With all the with all this publicity, with with PTSD and all the struggles you know that our law enforcement community goes through. I mean, isn't it a hindrance too for anybody to want to become what it? Okay, you're not. Yeah, well, they don't know it. You don't know what. What's that look like? You know? Well, twenty years down the road when that's just there's professions that. Well, I wants to get into. I think you're already starting to see it. You're starting to see a mass exodus one the suicide rates to the roof. So it's it's seeing that's hitting young police officers in the face right everybody where, every every young child, at least I did. Everybody grows up wanting to be a hero. Yeah, people fantasize about saving somebody's life or, yeah, or being somebody. Let's see today that has changed, though. Now police are the police are the equivalent of the Vietnam veterans coming back from VI and I'm getting spent in the face. One of the worst videos I've ever seen. It was the start of it. It was actually the it was. It was like the like the spark there was to New York City police officers. I don't down on the street a white officer at a African American officer and like in the Marine Corps we called it like green and dark. This is light blue and dark blue, that the people around them were pouring buckets of water over them. I remember seen and it was the worst thing I've ever seen. There were pouring buckets over them and and they're last two years. Not the COPS, the cops. It was real and it wasn't like a party, it wasn't set up. It's just total disrespect. It's like a year or two ago. Was a couple years ago. There which walking back to the car and all these people just coming up, just dumping it was. Yeah, I remember something more of New York City. It was doing a pandemic. Yeah, so that was just the beginning of it. It's gotten it the rapid. It went rapid. Yeah, it's this isn't a slow this isn't a slow like a slow fuse. This this went rapid. MMM. That the intent the yeah, there's some bad cops out there, but there's bad cops and there's bad people in every profession. Mostly and all. Listen. I have some really great friends and I listen. Not One time ever, and I want to say this, and people this is going to be very not ever in twenty years and law enforcement, did I ever hear anybody ever say, Hey, today I'm going to go lock up in an African American person or I'm going to beat somebody up today. Not One time. If I'm lying, if this is a lie, my son drop over dead right now. Not One time. But because because we are getting hammered, law enforcement is getting hammered through the TV movies, people believe that crap. In fact, I just Randy Sutton, who is the founder of the wounded blue I just called him and said Randy, because he's a voice of American law enforcement, he's will see Ann Fox News. I knew randy very well. I said, here's a talking point. My wife and I were watching. My WIFE LOVES THESE CHICAGO MED CHICAGO FIRES, to Chicago, everything PD on that Wednesday nights, all three, you know, the classic TV Cop. This guy, Hank Hank is the sergeant and he's a and he's got a real reepo like that kind of voice. It's so overthetop, you know. So he finds a bad guy in a there's a cop that gets her or something like that, abducted. I've never ever in my entire career, how ever, heard of a police officer being abducted, but somehow in this TV show they're going to starbucks to get a coffee and there's a car jacking in front of them and there, you know, all at it's constant. Well, he, this cop, gets adducted, Hank. Then you got to understand there's people over the country, all over the world watching this shit. Right. He finds the guy in a warehouse alone. He change them to a change into like a tractor, something like...

...that, and starts beating a living hell out of them and then shoots him and then takes him outside, buries them, digs a grave, puts them in the grave, poors gasoline over top them, sets them on fire. And buries them. Now, if you're not a police officer, you will. You would think, Oh my God, this is what these people do, these cops do, Oh my God, like leath, even in lethal weapon. Goes back, all way back to then you oh my God, that shit is so far from the truth. But they don't they don't know it. Ninety eight percent of policing is extreme boredom. This is where the traumatic stress comes from. Right, it's extreme boredom. It's in a second from sitting on the side, like you said before, you go from right. Usually drives. Yeah, yeah, too beautiful morning, watching a guy burn on, burning alive. or You stop, stop some car for speeding or for a tail like being out, because they want you to stop there and be yeah, and then in a split second alls they want to do is they want to kill you. You're dead. They want to kill you. Yeah, your writing reports, sitting in court like you would never want to see real policing. Never would. You wouldn't get any rings. They be canceled. The first sitting in a barrack, sitting in a crossover, running radar, the old days with radar, because that's laser. It's boring, it's boredom. You know, people are scared to death to going to jail. Yeah, and see, the other thing too, is about like you're either one of two things. Police officers are one of two things. You're either the second coming of Jesus Christ, where they kind of have that out, that kind of when people need you write, there's a domestic situation, you're a savior or your Satan. Most of the Times you're Satan. Most of the time you are the bad guy. You are the enemy and I hate you because you're writing me a ticket for doing twenty miles over whatever. You're never there's that old old days. They to say, Oh, if you worked on the shore, they come out and they'll give you a pie on the side of Ry O. my God, thank you so much. Know it's I want to kill you, I'm gonna kill you, I want to beat you to death. Will that ever change, though? No, not now. and Hollywood and politicians are Hollywood politicians. It's buried it. I mean you let the classic thing you're seeing now, the stuff that's in Baltimore City, this is just the beginning. MMM. That's why I think it should be mandatory. Two things should be mandatory. Number one I believe if you're going to serve in the Senate or as president, I believe you should have served in the military as well, especially president. How can be commander achieve if you never served? Number two, if you're going to be a politician, if you're representing even if it's local, all the way up to the state level, I believe you should have to go on a ride along with the police department's police departments for a week. You should see from a month or month there you got even better one month and you can see what they're going through. But you don't need it. You Don almost have to go. They'd almost have to go on a ride along where nobody knows who they are, because, yeah, but will act like judges, will act the okay, here's what happened this it's this. This part has been a slow that. This, this other stuff before all this, all this new thing. That look, I used to spend my life in court, as I made so many rests and made so many trafic stops. What happens is is this, is that troopers are out there writing tickets because that's their job, right, that's their job. They're mandated by the state. They're out there. Yeah, you want you want them to think that they're out there, that they're slowing down. It's slow down the traffic and all it's revenue producers, the revenuers. That's the truth, and I can guarantee you if somebody hears me say this they're not going to be to be about it. But that's the truth. Right, they're making money for the state now with these speed cameras. Forget troopers. They put up these speed cameras, forget it. They're going to make more money. The trippers aren't even have to make dress like the self check out line in the stores. Why even have troopers out anymore? Right. So what happened is is this over time, that week set up a bill of rights, of constitution and everything else. Okay, MMM, but as the courts started going and people started doing arguments and it was it. Now the bill of Rights is. You don't even know what the reality of the Constitution is. It's so covered up in so many different decisions and this and that. You the troopers are hands are tie. You cannot like to get a search warrant. The craziest going back to these police, the the the TV show things like they show a pamphlet. I'm here's your search warrant. Search warrant of like thirty five pages.

Eight. Eight. It takes forever to write a search warrant. It takes months and months and months of preparation. There is no hey, call to judge, we're going to get a search warrant on this place and judge is going to no, no, it's not real. So that's degraded. So now a trooper could do something perfect. I used to tell my troopers asted work for me, do your best police work when you're in the street. Police and police do it Wright because you can't control what happens in court. You can't know. I got a guy one time when a search warrant with thirty pounds a marijuana and his house and they judge, this visiting judge, gave him probation for thirty thirty pounds of weed. Probation, bastion. Right. You can't control what happens in the courts because you get you get judges who are that since our politicians or judge could be pissed off at you. No, not necessarily, but they just they have their own visions. It's not technical. You know, they can do what they want to do. You can work your tail off and they'll or some like. Let me get classic, like the classic one. This has happened. I stopped this guy one time this long time ago when I was at Annapolis Barrack. Stop this guy, I'll say fast. Stop this guy from an Appolis, Hi's a called on PCP MMM, and he's a little guy, no shirt. It's in the middle of winter. He's free it's freezing out, he's sweating. I'm fighting him, trying to stop him for tailgating, fighting for his life. He wants, he wants to, trying to get my God, I'm holding one to him. When the waiting for backup. We're fight and he was it was like an animal. Well, goes to court, he gets found not guilty. Know why? Do you know why? Because I didn't know how fast I was truth, I don't know how fast the car in front of him was going. What swear got my first exposure. So so you got that right. We're troopers, police officers. Hands are tied. You have no idea, you have no you want, you think you haven't in it, but their hands are tight. So they got to work within these constant changing rules, right with people who hate them. So what happens is police band together, the Thin Blue Line together, because it's us against them. Right, these people are not going to give up. In fact, somebody said this. Well, you could one my post, you could turn in your two week notice. No, no, I've never seen anybody turn in or two week notice. Your you serve. What's it? Let name of your podcast. Lifetime ooth. It's a lifetime oath. That's what you're going to do. You're going to be a police saucer. That's it. Military Police. MMM. And they stick with it and before you know it they become very jaded, very jaded toward the rest of the world. Cops stick with cops and then the deal with their problems and they start drinking, gambling, they become you know, they're out mess around on our wives. That's the biggest thing about cops, that cops. They always say cops are terrible. They've been divorced three, four, five times. It's because of ptsday. HMM. I thought that was interesting. What you said earlier about when you said why you got into the military was to impress your father. HMM. And often think about why why do people get into police? It's usually their father was a police officer, their grandfather, they're all some family member that they looked up to. I want to idolize. I wanted I want. Here's what I'll I have to really dig down in myself for this answer. I wanted to be you got to know my back my back story when I was a child, the stuff that happens, being bullied. I wanted to I wanted to impress people. I wanted to be the troopers. So look at me, all right, okay, and I wanted to do good and I wanted to be the superman, because that's who I was right type a out of the Marine Corps. You know that the hardest branch of service that there is the Marine Corps. So I wanted to be a state trooper because of the look, they ambience of the being in Maryland state troop, both the stets and the whole thing. I wanted that right because I wanted to be that guy. It wasn't about carrying a gone and treating people poorly or I wanted to be that guy. I wanted to be as the savior. I wanted it. I wanted it, and that's the furthest from the truth. That's that's not the way it is. The way it is is nightmares. Now I'm so happy to be retired. I have no idea. I really my hats off to everybody who stays on the job, but I can tell you this is this because of my involvement with with all these charities across the country, Wounded Blue v our station, all these different charities across the country that if people knew what was how police officers, young and old, are impacted by what's happening, you would have a whole...

...new respect. Yeah, suicide rites through the roof, melting as illness. And now the problem too, is the other problem, too, is is you really don't have to eat. Even when I was on the job and this happened for me to. The big guys are scared of you. They're scared of you. They want to stay with far away from you as a pot humanly possible. This is one of the reasons you see them run right. They want to stay as far away from human as possible. You don't have to worry, you don't have to worry so much about them. You know what you really got to worry about? What happens in the walls of your police station. HMM, because they will ruin your life and then go to lunch to cover their butts. The people above them, your tenants and made of the command staff. They will fry you because they don't want the liability you want. You want the truth. That's that's a hailstorm at what I just told you, because I can. I know many, many, many police officers will say the exact same thing. So the high so it's just like the military all over again. You're expendable. Wow, they they do not. And the and the worst part about it is is that the adminted administrators, they don't want it coming back on the police department. They want to use you in a scapegoat to get it off of them. Now it's even more so. I mean they're the first ones that'll fly a flag, oh he did the wrong thing, because they don't want the liability. But yet if they would have looked in their training logs, able to see that they train the guy to do that. Well, like, I'm not going to because, yeah, that one senderary. But that's the case. It's you. You worry about what happens more on the inside it because there's no loyalty. Now like that, that whole loyalty thing that it's not there anymore. No, in the old days we would all like everybody in my wedding party. They were all troopers. We would all have lunch together, dinner, got to hang out together, go out together, go as sing patties day, have a good time, I have to you know, go ever each other's houses, lookouts in this and that and help each other move. And now they don't even hang out together. They go home and get on the computer and Games. That's how they meet. So it's everything has changed and now you're getting a different breed to back. Then you get military guys. Yeah, and then they started looking for college educated, well, high scool. God, Love You, God, love you. you go out there deal what we had to deal with were these people aren't playing. They're playing for keeps. Yeah, this isn't their job, they're playing for their life. It's it's hell on earth. It's war every day you go to work and you have no idea why it's going to happen. It's like the game. Like it. So you switch. I like switch. Let'sten going home. I can tell you going home. I'm get ready to go home. One Night I was running late and I was just when I lived in bottom county. Going home, I go out on ninety five, jump up on ninety five and they are given out a broadcast about this taxi cab that out car jacked. MMM, this pink taxicab and Gilm burning with a white top and hit pink. Yeah, believing. Okay. So when it cops here, these lookouts. So you never really listen to him. You say. The response is, I'm direct and means I heard you. Yes, I heard it. I'm direct. They'd say, look out, Glembarney, all cars look after the eats a direct. PTHREE is direct. That's my car, number P three rack pretty spect so jump down on ninety five and it's thirty at night. Pink tax guess what's right in front of me? FREAKING pink taxicab. No, and I'm like, I'm in an UNMARK car because I'm the hot gun. The guys that are on the mark cars are the top guns. There, the guys. Thing. Are You thinking? Shit now, I'm like excited in that. Yeah, I'm excited. Shit, I want to go no, I want to go home, but oh shit, excited, more excited. You gotta know. It's like a shark right like when everybody else is when you're at the beach and and and the lifeguard screams shark. Everybody runs out of the beach. The cops are running into the beach. Yeah, okay, you call out a chase man, cops come out of the woodwork, come out all duty again. Why, Barbro I'm under like a shit, like a Huh, because I'm in on Mark Car right. It's right in front of me. Carjacking right in front of me, you know, I'm think I could get at it. I'm not thinking I can get killed. I could get shot. It's a car jacking. Obviously somebody's got a gun. Whatever it's. I call the Barck. I'm like, what's that tag again? They read it. Yep, it's right in front of me. What do you want me to do? Because I'm an UN mark car. You don't know this, but on our cars like you should wait till you got a mark car around you, where that the whole world knows you're the police, right, they said. God, try to stop it. I was like, okay, here we go, turn lights on, hit the siren. Ten it's called thousand eighty high speed chase tenay Glen Burnie high speed chase. He takes off, because...

...it's just like you see on TV, because up won't up on the night. And now you ain't beating my car. My car was given to me. I was a troop of the year. So it had a corved zero one engine in it. It would smoke the tires and reverse. You are not getting away from this car. Hey. So it was an old caprice, the bubbled Caprice, not the not the boxing one. Right. We takes off. He takes up on six hundred and ninety five, goes off, you think, gets off the exit to go to Brooklyn Park. I don't know if you know where this yeah, and he hits the hit. It's the hits. The hits the curb. It's just like you see on cops right, like the tire blows and now he's run in one, his one, his on the rims and there sparks going off shot right. So he's going northbound on I'm like, Oh, yeah, yeah, go for a boy. Let's go right, let's run. So I'm going northbound on one Richie Highway, going into Brooklyn Park and county's going southbound. I'm like, county's going South Banklob Bertie turn them around. Now this is where it gets good. Turn around. They're going south band down and I'm going northbound. Right, I get up to an intersection. A body of mine who's you don't want a county police officer. He committed suicide. They don't want Oh man day friend, like God rest the soul great guy. Great Guy is standing in the intersection. The car go see's Dave standing in the intersection, standing on. You can in the intersection. He's by his car, standing in the intersection and the car goes right at him. Boom goes boom boom. Steps out of the way because the cars trying to hit him. Right he goes boom, boom, boom. Is Shooting at the car and I'm right behind the car. I'm like here's county shoot at the car, glumb burning county shooting at the Carlburn like like. So we found the cars come up. Long Story Short, he goes down, gets in a crash and it is what it is. But my license was suspended. You do bop right, yeah, Goof Ball. You know. So, so he know it was. It was. He he cart was a car Jack. Yeah, carjacker. He jacked the car. So I don't think I mean just good. He was he was high on crack. He was a Crackett. So I mean it is stuff like that. It's just like moment, like within a moment's Mont notice, your life goes from zero to one hundred. Right, your life hangs in the balance. But because cops are so tuned in, I'm like hello, yeah, you know, that's why. I mean, listen, why do you think? Like the best of the best guys are SWAT team? Good, Lord, okay, TV show, AH, let's go in, let's stack up and go in. No, no, no, callt the state teams. Marylyn state police has a has a star Swat team, is called the state team, called a Swat team, state team, and you wait an hour before you go in and let them do it. Right. I know that stuff, right. I did a lot of raids. I was always the Ram guy and all that stuff. But yeah, yeah, yeah, just like fliptop, boompo. And then you're never off because everybody knows who you are, they know what you do. You go to a party or family party and they have a bunch of people eat. Oh, I heard your trooper. Can I tell you a story? I has to tell people. I was a trash man. I'm trying. He has any questions for trash men? I gotta take it this time. And you know, you can never shut off people knocking on your door. You cannot get get away from it. You got to mark police car on your driveway. MMM, I mean when you're a Nark and then people were scared to death. I mean because you know I look like. What would you say to it as a person if they came to you today and so they want to be a coup stay trooper, I'd say you're out in your mind. Don't do it. Don't do my granddaddy was my dad, my grandfather. That was a different age. Don't do it, don't do it. Don't do it, because you you really not only now, you really out there now. I mean they're putting bounties on cops. There's to New York City police officers sitting in a car having lunch. They walcome killed them both, just sitting there eating lunch. Why would you want to do that? Yeah, why would you want to be the most hated, disrespected person in the face of this earth? Wow, it doesn't there have to be a population that will go against the grain and sho there are there are popular lesson ready for us. There is a population like you two, because I know you're both made big supporters of law enforcement and first responders, which means the world to me, and I mean that it would almost makes me want a tear up. It means more too, by us that stand on the other side of that line. Because, guys, I said this to you for off before we're doing it. You do not want to know what's on the other side of that line. You don't want to know it. You want to keep your rose colored glasses of one. You don't...

...want to know what lingers in your neighborhood that we have to deal with. You don't want to know. But what's it? What's the future of America look like without National Guard military? Want to know what I really and want my real opinion, the my real opinion, because I you have to got to understand this ideal, with this every day with the clients of my clients, right law enforcement, running he sutton, Eddie, Richardson, Jim Banish, Pat Colin in all these different charities that are all the hide in the police officers who are having problems. What I really think is going to happen? It's got to get worse before it gets better. I think like you're all you're hearing. In fact, the other day I heard it on the news and my wife started laughing because I said I it's hard to believe they're there. In one hand they're complaining that bottomer city is all time crime rate is through the roof. Police are leaving in droves. Everybody's leaving. You know the crime rate. They're tearing down statues and there the crime. People are getting too awful things happening in bomber city. And then in the same breath they're talking about defunding the police. You go ahead and do that, go ahead to fund the police, but I want all my brothers and sisters resigned. I want them all to go. And then you get what you get. You want to see what's bad, look what happened in Portland. Hmm, look what now? What's going on? Look behind the scenes, looks who it's really controlling. A lot of us, a lot of this is controlled, but politicians it's a gets up game, it's a play. They're getting people because they want it, but they're doing it with people's lives. These are people's lives and these are men and women who are willing to put their lives on the line on a daily basis, twenty four hours a day, seven days a week, three d sixty five days a years, years for twenty five to what? Twenty five years? And what's what's battling is is you like what's going through my mind is that that kind of police farricade? You know where they're in the where they're in their in their gear, and there's the bright gear. Were right. Yeah, you've got the you've got the protesters on the other side of the line and they're spitting yeah, on h whatever they're doing. And then a week later, you know, the the police officers off duty, the protester is, you know, has gone back to the House and they're walking by each other, like you said earlier, in the supermarket. It's like, what are we what are we doing here? There's that, but steep what they don't that's really weird for me to think about. The problem is it's because I blame it solely on the media. I blame it on your walking into a grocery store, you hold the door open for the person by your thinking, Oh shit, you were the you were the cop that I was smashing in the head. Listen. They don't let listen, they don't go cops uncle home and go into a box and plug in and they plug in and they shut off and y you on tie. It's not Robo Cock guys with these are guys with kids and families and husbands and wives that are standing they're standing guard for us in the middle of night when when you're laying laying the bed in your in bed in your neighborhoods, who do you think is making you safe? Yeah, how do you think you can lay your head and been not worry about getting, MMM, getting your door kicked in or your your kids killed or, worse, your wife, your daughters comes and then he and then that. What where my mind goes to is you know that they keeping firearms and the house, protecting your homestead and all that stuff, and it just gets it put your mind in a weird space when you don't have that public protection. Well, let me take this this because you just said something. Let me take this a step further. I have a son. He's twenty five years old. He Graduated University mere on Coege Park. I'm extremely streaming proud of my son, but a long time ago used to hunt and I had fifty sixty guns in my house and then I had to sell them. I sold all my guns later one because I needed money. And but my my son grew up around the firearms mmma used to have in our Nur class back in school. Yeah, he grew up around firearms. I there were times when I want unload my gun safe and there'd be fifty sixty guns laying out on the ground. I'd be cleaning them doing making count because you know how guys like just look at their guns and count them and clean them and just whatever. I come home off at work, you know, I come off at work and take my gun belt off. Laying on the floor. There's a gun in it loaded. Wanted a pipe. My son could care less. He didn't care. You want to know why I didn't care? He was taught, because he was taught right. He shot the guns he knew...

...with the devastations and it took away that. I was watching a TV show the other, the other night, last night, or whatever, called mystery in between, with a little girl go shoots his father, her father's pistol, because she finds it hidden. Don't hide it, show them, yeah, show them. So my son didn't care, you know, he didn't care. He didn't care that there's a big deal dad's gun belt. He didn't try to get it out, he didn't go in and try to get my gun safe, because he could shoot the damn things anytime he wanted. All, as he had to say to me, is that, I mean the boys shot more ducks and geese and deer in the near and think of but he knew the devastation. A gun is not going you can lean it against the wall and it's not going to just random and start killing people. It's right the boost of the criminal. It's the person that's doing it. The city is not. They're blaming it on the gun. The gun isn't doing it. It's the person with the you. All three of us were all friends here. I think I could have five guns laneloaded and they are all pointed me. I wouldn't worry about it, not at all. None of them are going to go off at now youtube pick him up and shoot me, but they're going to blame it on something else other than the reality. The reality is criminality. HMM, it's criminality. It's you. Unfortunately. You gotta Lock People Up, you got to lock them up. There is no more. What is the what's the words? I'm looking for, whether they transform them or whatever. When they're it, you're you're literally like cattle. That's what that's what's going on now. They're not trying to rehabilitate. No, and now these people are called with guns or whatever. They're out quicker than somebody for, say, you, tax invasion or whatever. Oh Yeah, Oh, yeah, yeah, yeah, and then said, and here's the other thing too, is that the ridiculous thing? Is this, like the most ridiculous thing I ever heard in my life. Is, like I heard that in the city, that they want to stop arresting people for small possession of drugs and prostitution. Yeah, well, there's an old adage like the smallest crimes can add up to the biggest stopped. But the other thing too, is people used to say to me all time, why are you arresting? You should be out getting the murders in the racist and I would say you ever go fishing? I said yeah, to catch every fishing to see catch them one at a time. Right, if you stop doing if you stop doing little things, that means it's okay, it's okay, it's okay for me to commit get these cops are doing all this work, putting their life on the line. They take them the central booking in the city or wherever right, take them a central booking and they go through all this stuff, all this hardship, causing all this trauma, all this stuff, and now here comes trauma the states. While they are there, the person gets released. In the cops are still doing the paperwork. That's traumatic. When your own department and your own city turn against you, your own department in your own county, state government turns against you, you're the bad guy. What do you think that feels like? MMM, especially when you what's the name of the Peup Your podcast, lifetime ove, you've given a lifetime oath. It's incredibly depressing. What am I doing? It's in humane. What am I doing? Why am I even doing this? It's like Turner back like that. And this happened to face. When you, when you, when you, when you, you put people out in front of the people who were there to save you. Don't complain. When the shark starts coming around. Don't call for him then. Don't call for the people who you've demeaned. MMM, don't call what did you say the purge? What do you think's going to happen? I think it's going to get better because you're going to defund the police that people are alway sudden's just going to exist. It around and because Kumbaya. No, it's going to be open territory, it's going to be extreme lawlessness, there's going to be bloodshed. I'm telling you, telling you, it's going to happen. And cops are killing themselves, they're ruining their lives, their families, they're going through hell because their departments aren't back in them up. Their departments aren't doing anything. And charities like the wounded blue of our station, harbor of grace, all these different ones, are getting requests call constant window blue. I was on the phone when I was on the film with the Executive Director Peer Support, Jenny Hill, who was telling me that she's exhausted because that's all's they are doing is peer supports. Peer support is one of them. They're like the SWAT team of pure advocates. When DC, when the police were hurt, when they did the raid in DC, you know, the the capital teams rushed in to be there for the cops over there for a week talking every all the police officers, the trauma that they're going through, because it's...

...like, you know, you're when your own the people you're trying to protect, hate you. So what am I doing? And that's what's going to happen. They're just they're driving them, they're legitimately driving there like a comic that this is like a comic cozy pilot running right toward us like a ship's what's happening. You're seeing it, but you have yet to see the explosion. It's kind of get a lot worse. Yeah, and the trauma that's happening with law enforce I'm telling you. I've telling you this one the phone. This this was something that blew me off my heels. My wife, Dorn Covid, had a gallbladder. Something happened with a gobladder and we called the ambulance. She was in a lot intense pain and I live, you know, I live out in the country right. There's nothing browned right, and I mean you could go lay on out on my street for fifteen minutes and nobody, no car, will come down my road. Legitimately, all of a sudden that, you know, the first the first responders of the Amiland shows up and they come out to my door and I live in Cecil County in the middle of nowhere, and they're wearing Kevlar. The people in the Amlands, Emilands Cross, said, what the hell are you doing wearing Kevlar's like zero in the morning. What are you doing wearing Kevlar? Well, we got to you got to be kidding me. You're wearing Kevlar. You're an ambulance crew. Why would you think you're the you're the lifeblood right. I I go down to help the firefighters, like I was telling an earlier down inn on county fire professional firefighters association and the the fire in ms down there telling me they don't even have vests, that the upper echelon has the vests and they call them in a truck and they have to show up. Now firefighters and Emiliance Bes are going to being targeted. It's just it's if people, if you, if you are so this, I'm like right on the edge of getting choked up. If you're so on the edge and you absolutely appreciate veterans and police officers and firefighters MS, every time you see one, walk up and tell them that you support them. Really ask me. It gets me choked up because it's war against them. It's hard tell on them that you support them. Don't tell them that it matters, that they matter to you, because they think that the world's against them. It's just terrible. It is so well, George, Joe, thank you, George. Thank you, brother, thank you for your your service. I know you hate here in EPI seriously thank you because I know you got cut by the paper clip in the Marine Corps, but everything you did on the on the police force, I appreciate that. mording. You know, I'm prouder of my work today with these charities that I am. Well, I wanted to thank you for all that too, because all the charities that you work with in our part of is just amazing. And actually that's what we got to do another podcast talking strictly about the charities for that on this one, and then we still got to do the other one too. But no, seriously, thank you so much, separate five, brother, love you man, love you to man and Joe, just cause you don't know, we love you to separified Ellis, as a Marine Corps ter, mean and all these faithful actually, I do want to bring something up. But talk about the Brotherhood, and this is something I've seen different from the marines compared to other branches. Marines are not afraid to tell their brothers, or so when I say brothers, or sisters, others that have served, even if they didn't serve with them, that they love them. Yeah, it's something that there's nothing here's another only marines will always say Simperfi. You never see, there's no, there's no in the army, there's nothing in the Navy, down in your forces, and I do get upset when somebody says simplified to me and they they're not even a marines like because the first I say, Oh, you were in the Marine Court won't know. No, okay, I say Simperfi, but that's that's just me. You earned that right to say that. So, but no, guys. Thanks again, man. That's that you, George. Thank you, Joe. Thank you. If you have any interests of being a guest on lifetime move, just email me at rich Bennett. It's our Seh be and and Ett at Dan bencom. Dan Been Is Delta Alpha, November, Bravo, ECHO novembercom and yeah, we'll be sure to say let me get you on. This is a monthly podcast where you are looking for a people that are either acttive, military veterans, first responders, doctors, nurses, family members of spouses. Everybody's...

...got a story and we want to hear about it. So please, please, please, please. I can't ask good enough. Get in touch with me. We'll go ahead and get it scheduled. Doesn't matter whether you're here in the states or in another country. We have the ability to set it up to where we can still record. So again, just email me, rich Bennett at Dan bencom.

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